Measurement in Psychology: A Critical History of a Methodological Concept

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jun 17, 1999 - Psychology
1 Review
This book traces how such a seemingly immutable idea as measurement proved so malleable when it collided with the subject matter of psychology. It locates philosophical and social influences (such as scientism, practicalism and Pythagoreanism) reshaping the concept and, at the core of this reshaping, identifies a fundamental problem: the issue of whether psychological attributes really are quantitative. It argues that the idea of measurement now endorsed within psychology actually subverts attempts to establish a genuinely quantitative science and it urges a new direction. It relates views on measurement by thinkers such as Holder, Russell, Campbell and Nagel to earlier views, like those of Euclid and Oresme. Within the history of psychology, it considers contributions by Fechner, Cattell, Thorndike, Stevens and Suppes, among others. It also contains a non-technical exposition of conjoint measurement theory and recent foundational work by leading measurement theorist R. Duncan Luce.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jgrann - LibraryThing

An in-depth analysis of measurement as a concept and as a practice in psychology. Strengths included historical exposition on evolution of the measurement concept and analysis of interacting self ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER 1 Numerical data and the meaning of measurement
1
CHAPTER 2 Quantitative psychologys intellectual inheritance
24
CHAPTER 3 Quantity number and measurement in science
46
CHAPTER 4 Early psychology and the quantity objection
78
CHAPTER 5 Making the representational theory of measurement
109
CHAPTER 6 The status of psychophysical measurement
140
CHAPTER 7 A definition made to measure
162
CHAPTER 8 Quantitative psychology and the revolution in measurement theory
191
Glossary
220
References
224
Index
243
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information