Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713

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Institute of Early American History and Culture at Williamsburg, Va., 1972 - Social Science - 359 pages
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First published by UNC Press in 1972, "Sugar and Slaves" presents a vivid portrait of English life in the Caribbean more than three centuries ago. Using a host of contemporary primary sources, Richard Dunn traces the development of plantation slave society in the region. He examines sugar production techniques, the vicious character of the slave trade, the problems of adapting English ways to the tropics, and the appalling mortality rates for both blacks and whites that made these colonies the richest, but in human terms the least successful, in English America.

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Review: Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713

User Review  - Paul - Goodreads

In his book, Sugar & Slaves, Richard Dunn describes the development of sugar planting and processing in the Caribbean from 1624 Ė 1713. Dunn seeks to answer three questions in his book: how did ... Read full review

Review: Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713

User Review  - Sohee - Goodreads

This book is a monumental one in the historiography of the British colonies in the Caribbean. Dunn describes the development of the planter sugar class in the seventeenth century. While some specifics ... Read full review

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