The Passion Of The Western Mind: Understanding the Ideas That Have Shaped Our World View

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Random House, Oct 31, 2010 - History - 560 pages
51 Reviews

The Passion of the Western Mind is a complete guide to Western civilisation and the philosophical ideas that have shaped our world view. From Plato to Hegel, from Augustine to Nietzsche, from Copernicus to Freud, Richard Tarnas described profound philosophical concepts simply, but without simplifying them.

Ten years in the making, The Passion of the Western Mind was hailed as an instant classic on publication. In it, Tarnas provides a compelling account of the evolution of the Western mind and its changing conception of reality. Advances on several fronts - in philosophy, psychology, religous studies and the history of science - have shed new light on this remarkable evolution and Tarnas draws together these advances to set forth a new perspective for understanding out culture's intellectual and spiritual history. The result is a complete liberal education in a single volume.

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The best overview of western philosophy I've ever seen. - Goodreads
Cracking introduction to western philosophy. - Goodreads
However, in general this book is a good reference book. - Goodreads
It is a nice overview of western philosophy. - Goodreads

Review: The Passion of The Western Mind: Understanding the Ideas That Have Shaped Our World View

User Review  - Hevel Cava - Goodreads

Excellent! Read full review

Review: The Passion of The Western Mind: Understanding the Ideas That Have Shaped Our World View

User Review  - Kathy - Goodreads

it was indeed amazing Read full review

About the author (2010)

Richard Tarnas, Ph.D., is Distinguished Rockefeller Faculty, Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, and is director of its programme in Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness. A graduate of Harvard University and Saybrook Institute, he was formerly director of programmes and education at Esalen Institute.

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