Three Good Things

Front Cover
Bloomsbury, 2012 - Cookbooks - 415 pages
5 Reviews
How often have you wished there was a magic formula to simplify cooking? Well, there is. Put three good things together on a plate and, somehow, the whole is always greater and more delicious than the sum of its parts. Looking back over nearly two decades of professional cookery, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall has worked out the combinations that make magic. Salty, sweet, crunchy. Sharp, rich, crumbly. Hot, bland, crisp. Think scones with jam and cream, fish and chips with mushy peas, or porridge with golden syrup and cream. Hugh has used the formula of three to create more than 175 recipes, both well-loved classics and brand new ideas, based on trios like squash, ricotta and ham; aubergine, tomatoes and chickpeas; clams, tomatoes and garlic; chicken, tomatoes and tarragon; pork, potatoes and apples; pasta, courgettes and mozzarella; strawberries, cream and shortbread; and chocolate, ginger and digestives ... The list goes on. With sumptuous photography from Simon Wheeler, this book will unlock a whole new world of fantastic food. Three Good Things. It really is that simple.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
2
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Three Good Things

User Review  - Andy Cutright - Goodreads

Lots of good, simple recipes. Sometimes more than three ingredients. Recipes are clear and easy to follow. Read full review

Review: Three Good Things

User Review  - Charlotte - Goodreads

Brilliant concept but I haven't really made many recipes from it. Read full review

Related books

About the author (2012)

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall is a writer, broadcaster and campaigner. His series for Channel 4 have earned him a huge popular following, while his River Cottage books have collected multiple awards including the Glenfiddich Trophy (twice), the André Simon Food Book of the Year (three times), the Michael Smith Award (twice) and, in the US, the James Beard Cookbook of the Year. Hugh lives in Devon with his family.

Bibliographic information