The Resurrection of Mary Magdalene: Legends, Apocrypha, and the Christian Testament

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Bloomsbury Academic, Aug 31, 2004 - Religion - 382 pages
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The controversy surrounding Dan Brown's novel The Da Vinci Code has intensified interest in Mary Magdalene and Jane Schaberg provides an authoritative source for a deeper understanding and re-assessment of this popular figure. Within a progressive feminist framework, The Resurrection of Mary Magdalene approaches Christian Testament sources through analysis of legend, archaeology, and gnostic/apocryphal traditions. This is the story of the suppression and distortion of a powerful woman leader - Schaberg presents Mary Magdalene as successor to Jesus in a challenging alternative to the Petrine primacy. >

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The resurrection of Mary Magdalene: legends, apocrypha, and the Christian testament

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Schaberg (The Illegitimacy of Jesus: A Feminist Theological Interpretation of the Infancy Narratives of Matthew and Luke) moves from contemporary feminist concerns, through the vast array of legend ... Read full review

Review: The Resurrection of Mary Magdalene: Legends, Apocrypha, and the Christian Testament

User Review  - April - Goodreads

While Schaberg's writing is often quite beautiful, and she brings my beloved Virginia Woolf along for the journey, I found her text muddled and confusing. Without an index (except of biblical books ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Jane Schaberg is Professor of Religious Studies and Women's Studies at the University of Detroit Mercy. She is the author of The Illegitimacy of Jesus, and an editor of On the Cutting Edge: The Study of Women in the Biblical World. As an acknowledged expert on Mary Magdalene, she has appeared in the Washington Times, on CNN and in Newsweek.
Jane Schaberg is also a contributor to Secrets of Mary Magdalene Edited by Dan Burstein and Arne J. de Keijzer, with an introduction by Elaine H. Pagels.

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