Time Before History: The Archaeology of North Carolina

Front Cover
UNC Press Books, 1999 - Social Science - 312 pages
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North Carolina's written history begins in the sixteenth century with the voyages of Sir Walter Raleigh and the founding of the ill-fated Lost Colony on Roanoke Island. But there is a deeper, unwritten past that predates the state's recorded history. The
  

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
PaleoIndian Period before 8000 BC
2
Woodland Period 1000 BCAD 1600
3
Historic Period after AD 1540
5
A Brief History of North Carolina Archaeology
6
A New Focus on North Carolina Archaeology
8
Following in the Footsteps of Lederer and Lawson
9
The Keyauwee Excavation
11
The Early Saratown Phase AD 14501600
117
The Southern Piedmont
119
The Pee Dee Culture
123
The Caraway Phase AD 15001700
134
The Search for Cherokee Roots
138
The Woodland Period
139
The Early Woodland Period 1000300 BC
140
The Middle Woodland Period 300 BCAD 800
146

Federal Archaeology Begins at Peachtree
12
Building Cultural Chronologies
15
The Cherokee Project
17
North Carolina Archaeology Expands
18
Recent Research Programs across North Carolina
20
Notes on Organization
23
An Elusive Quarry
27
PaleoIndian Chronology in the Southeast
29
Middle PaleoIndian Subperiod 90008500 BC
31
PaleoIndian Settlement and Subsistence
32
The PaleoIndian Period in North Carolina
35
The Coastal Plain
36
The Mountains
46
A Time of Regionalization and Specialization
47
The Archaic Period in the Piedmont
49
Early Archaic Period 80006000 BC
51
Middle Archaic Period 60003000 BC
58
Late Archaic Period 3OOO1O00 BC
64
The Archaic Period in the Mountains
67
Early Archaic Period 80006000 BC
69
Middle Archaic Period 60003000 BC
70
The Archaic Period on the Coast and Coastal Plain
72
Summary
75
The Woodland Period in the Piedmont
76
The Piedmont Village Tradition
78
The Early Woodland and Middle Woodland Periods 1000 BC AD 800
80
The Yadkin Phase
83
Recent Research and the EarlyMiddle Woodland Chronology
85
Early Excavations in the Northeast Piedmont
87
The Whites Creek Survey and the Forbush Creek Excavations
95
Summary
97
The Late Woodland Period AD 8001600
98
The Uwharrie Phase AD 8001200
100
The Haw River Phase AD 10001400
103
The Dan River Phase AD 10001450
105
The Donnaha Phase AD 10001450
109
The Hillsboro Phase AD 14001600
112
The Late Woodland Period AD 8001100
157
The South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition
158
The Pisgah Phase AD 10001450
160
Mound Structure and Political Complexity
175
Lamar Culture and the Qualla Phase after AD 1350
178
The Eastern Fringe of the Appalachian Summit
190
Summary
192
6 The Woodland Period on the Coast and Coastal Plain
194
A Brief History of Coastal Plain Archaeology
195
The Early Woodland Period 1000300 BC
199
The Deep Creek and New River Phases
200
Hamps Landing
202
The Middle Woodland Period 300 BCAD 800
203
The Cape Fear Phase
204
Sand Burial Mounds
206
The Late Woodland Period AD 8001650
210
The Colington Phase
211
The White Oak Phase
216
The Cashie Phase
223
Summary
226
Tribes Traders and Turmoil
229
The Contact Period in the Central Piedmont AD 16001710
233
The Mitchum Phase AD 16001670
235
The Jenrette Phase AD 16001680
237
The Fredricks Phase AD 16801710
242
The North Central Piedmont during the Contact Period
247
The Late Saratown Phase AD 16701710
248
Contact Interaction and Cultural Change in the Piedmont
254
European Plants and Livestock
256
Disease
257
The Contact Period in the Appalachian Summit
260
The Late Qualla Phase AD 17001838
267
The Contact Period along the North Carolina Coast
272
Summary
275
References Cited
277
Index
299
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About the author (1999)

H. Trawick Ward is a research archaeologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He collaborated with Vincas P. Steponaitis, R. P. Stephen Davis, and Patrick Livingood to create Excavating Occaneechi Town: Archaeology of an Eighteenth-Century Indian Village in North Carolina, an award-winning CD-ROM multimedia publication.

Davis is a research archaeologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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