Western Poultry Book (Google eBook)

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Mrs. A. Basley, 1910 - Poultry - 198 pages
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Page 86 - ... by inch and a half stuff is covered with wire netting of one inch mesh. The door is ten and onehalf inches wide and ten inches high and does not fill the entire entrance, a space of two and a half inches being left at the bottom and one and a half inches at the top, with a good margin at each side to avoid friction. If it filled the entire space it would be clumsy in its action. It is hinged at the top and opens up into the box. The hinges are placed on the front of the door rather than at the...
Page 88 - ... when it is closed. The latch acts quickly enough to catch the door before it rebounds. It was feared that the noise arising from the closing of the door might startle the hens, so instead of wooden stops, pieces of old rubber belting were nailed at the outside entrances for the door to strike against. The double box with nest in the rear end is necessary, as when a bird has laid and desires to leave the nest, she steps to the front and remains there until released. With one section only, she...
Page 86 - It is twenty-eight inches long, thirteen inches wide and thirteen inches deep, inside measurements. A division board with a circular opening seven and one-half inches in diameter is placed across the box twelve inches from the back end and fifteen inches from the front end. The back section is the nest proper. Instead of a close door at the entrance, a light frame of inch by inch-and-a-half stuff is covered with wire netting of one-inch mesh.
Page 110 - ... 50 dozen eggs; so that the cost of material would not exceed 1 cent a dozen. Pure water that has been boiled and then cooled should be used. To each 15 to 20 quarts of water 1 quart of water-glass should be added. The solution should be prepared, placed in the jar or other suitable vessel, and the fresh eggs added from time to time until the jar is filled; but be sure that there is 2 inches of the solution covering the eggs. The eggs should not be washed before packing, for washing injures the...
Page 88 - The door promptly swings down and fastens i itself in place by its lower edge striking the light end of a wooden latch or lever pressing it down and slipping over it, the lever immediately coming back into place and locking the door. The latch is five inches long, one inch wide and a half inch thick, and is fastened loosely one inch from its center to the side of the box, so that the outer end is just inside of the door when it is closed. The latch acts quickly enough...
Page 110 - A dry cool cellar ia a good place. If the eggs are kept in too warm a place the silicate is deposited and the eggs are not properly protected. Do not wash the eggs before packing, for by so doing you injure their keeping quality, probably by dissolving the mucilaginous coating on the outside of the shell. For packing, use only perfectly fresh eggs, for stale eggs will not be saved and may prove harmful to the others. * * " Water glass is a very cheap product, that can usually be produced at not to...
Page 194 - ... remedy for fowls, but he states that turkeys are unfavorably affected by it. It may be given in doses of 30 to 45 grains mixed with butter and made into pills. Male fern is also a very effectual remedy and may be used in the form of powder (dose 30 grains to i dram) or of liquid extract (dose 15 10.30 drops).
Page 86 - ... close to the open door of the pens for cleaning out worn material, and delivering new bedding, and also in allowing attendants to enter and leave all pens from the outside walk, and reach the feed room without passing through intervening pens. TRAP NESTS. The nest which we use is original with us. It is very simple, inexpensive, easy to attend and certain in its action. It is a box-like structure without front end or cover, 28 inches long, 13 inches wide and 16 inches deep, inside measure. A...
Page 187 - I will tell you what I would do, were I in your place," the young chief rejoined. " As soon as I got to Cairo, I would send for the richest slavemerchant in the market, and I would choose twenty of the prettiest women for myself. I would then send for the richest jewelers, and would make them give me up a good share of their stock. I would then do the same...
Page 109 - ... and in taste they were not to be distinguished from fresh, unpacked store eggs. Of twenty methods tested in Germany, the three which proved most effective were coating the eggs with vaseline, preserving them in limewater, and preserving them in water glass. The conclusion was reached that the last is preferable, because varnishing the eggs with vaseline takes considerable time, and treating them with limewater is likely to give the eggs a limy flavor.

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