Instruments of Science: An Historical Encyclopedia

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Robert Bud, Deborah Jean Warner
Taylor & Francis, 1998 - Science - 709 pages
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"This fascinating encyclopedia presents 325 historically significant scientific instruments from antiquity to the present. Instruments used for testing and monitoring in addition to those used for research are studied, including laboratory organisms such as E.coli. Each of the signed entries explains how the instrument works and how it is used, as well as tracing its invention, development, and distribution. The instrument's effect on the scientific community and society is also explored. Beautiful illustrations accompany many of the entries. The editors from the Science Museum in London and the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History have provided an excellent addition to the history of sciences".--"Outstanding Reference Sources : the 1999 Selection of New Titles", American Libraries, May 1999. Comp. by the Reference Sources Committee, RUSA, ALA.
  

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About the author (1998)

Robert Bud holds a doctorate in the History and Sociology of Science from the University of Pennsylvania, and serves as Head of Research (Collections) at the Science Museum in London. His widespread publications on the history of chemistry and biotechnology include Invisible Connections: Instruments, Institutions and Science (l992), and The Uses of Life: A History of Biotechnology (l993).
Deborah Warner holds a M.A. in the History of Sciences from Harvard University, and serves as Curator of Physical Science Collections at the National Museum of American History. Her widespread publications in the history of science and scientific instruments include Alvan Clark & Sons: Artists in Optics (1968; rev. 1996), and The Sky Explored: Celestial Cartography 1500-1800 (1979). She is also founder and editor of Rittenhouse, a quarterly journal of the American instrument enterprise.

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