Kievan Russia

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Yale University Press, 1973 - History - 412 pages
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Kievan Russia was originally published in a clothbound edition in 1948 as volume two in George Vernadsky's comprehensive series, A History of Russia. It is now available for the first time in a paperbound edition. At the time of its publication Kievan Russia received the following reviews: The account of this little-know chapter of Russian history is based on a formidable mass of Slavic Byzantine, Germanic, and Oriental (notably Arabic and Persian_ sources. Much of this material is new, and the thorough utilization of all primary and secondary literature accumulated since Kluchevsky wrote his great history easily makes this volume the definitive study of the Kievan period in the English language. There is hardly an aspect of the life of Russia at that time which remains untouched, and the scope of the author's interests and erudition is indeed impressive...When all is said, Vernadsky's filling a definite gap in American historical literature.-The Annals
  

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Contents

KIEVAN RUSSIAS PLACE IN HISTORY
1
THE IMPERIAL PLAN AND ITS FAILURE 878972
19
CONVERSION TO CHRISTIANITY
48
THE KIEVAN REALM 9901139
73
Introductory Remarks
99
Natural Resources and Population
102
Hunting Apiculture and Fishing
105
Agriculture and Cattle Breeding
107
The Judiciary
207
On Political Feudalism in Kievan Russia
209
THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION 11391237
214
The Struggle for Kiev 113969
217
Keeping the Balance between East Russia and West Russia 11691222
220
Defense of the Frontier
223
the Bat tle of the Kalka 1223
235
Time Runs Short 122337
239

Metallurgy 11 1
111
Textile Arts Furriery Tanning Ceramics
114
Commerce
116
Money and Credit
121
Capital and Labor
123
National Income
126
Prosperity and Depression
128
SOCIAL ORGANIZATION 1 The Basic Social Units
131
Social Stratification
135
The Upper Classes
137
The Middle Classes
140
The Lower Classes
143
The Halffree
146
The Slaves
149
The Church People
151
Woman
154
The Steppe Frontiersmen
157
National Minorities
158
on Economic and Social
163
Feudalism in Kievan Russia
164
GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 1 Introductory Remarks
173
The Lands and the Principalities
175
The Three Elements of Government
177
The Princely Administration
187
Branches of Administration
189
The CityState
196
The Local Commune
201
The Manor
202
The Church
204
RUSSIAN CIVILIZATION IN THE KIEVAN PERIOD 1 Introductory Remarks
241
Language and Script
242
Folklore
246
Music
251
Theater
253
Fine Arts
256
Religion
263
Literature
270
Education
277
The Humanities
280
Sciences and Technology
295
THE WAYS OF LIFE 1 City and Country Life
301
Dwellings and Furniture
302
Dress
303
Food
306
Health and Hygiene
308
The Cycle of Life
310
Manner of Life
313
Public Calamities
315
RUSSIA AND THE OUTSIDE WORLD IN THE KlEVAN PERIOD 1 Preliminary Remarks
317
Russia and the Slavs
318
Russia and Scandinavia
332
Russia and the West
337
Russia and Byzantium
348
Russia and the Caucasus
353
Russia and the East
360
ABBREVIATIONS
366
INDICES
387
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About the author (1973)

Professor Emeritus George Vernadsky of Yale University was a Russian emigre who settled in the United States and became one of the foremost historians on the subject of his native land. His life, he said, fell into three periods. The first was his youth in Moscow, taking his degree from the University of Moscow, teaching Russian history at the University of Petrograd (1914--17) in the stimulating intellectual atmosphere of the former St. Petersburg, and finally, studying and teaching in the Urals and Crimea, where, he said, even the revolution did not unduly disturb the universities. His second period was seven years in exile, spent teaching in Constantinople, Athens, Prague, and Paris. In 1927, invited to Yale, he came to the United States and remained in New Haven, first as a research associate in history and then as professor of Russian history, for the rest of his academic career. Gradually he produced a monumental body of work on Russian history. "While the transition from one span of my life to another was more or less painful,"he said, "the more I think of the course of my life, the more I find that in many respects I should be grateful to Fate for this tortuous path, since it gave me the variety and richness of experience, and since in each of the three paths I was fortunate to meet so many kind and congenial friends." Vernadsky's major work is the five-volume A History of Russia (1943--69). Planned as a collaboration between Vernadsky and Michael Karpovich of Harvard University, it was originally intended to run to nine volumes, but Karpovich's death in 1959 ended the possibility of his doing the later sections, and no further volumes appeared. Nevertheless, for the period it covers---to the time of the Renaissance and Reformation in Europe---it is the definitive work. Vernadsky's shorter A History of Russia (1961) brings the history of Russia up to the nuclear age.

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