Dictionary of Policing

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Professor of Criminology and Social Policy and Director Mannheim Centre for Criminology Tim Newburn, Tim Newburn, Peter Neyroud
Routledge, Jun 17, 2013 - Social Science - 384 pages
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This book deals with the genesis, outbreak and far-reaching effects of a legal controversy and the resulting outbreak of mass violence, which determined the course of British colonial rule after post World War Two in Singapore and Malaya. Based on extensive archival sources, it examines the custody hearing of Maria Hertogh, a case which exposed tensions between Malay and Singaporean Muslims and British colonial society. Investigating the wide-ranging effects and crises faced in the aftermath of the riots, the analysis focuses in particular on the restoration of peace and rebuilding of society. The author provides a nuanced and sophisticated understanding of British management of riots and mass violence in Southeast Asia. By exploring the responses by non-British communities in Singapore, Malaya and the wider Muslim world to the Maria Hertogh controversy, he shows that British strategies and policies can be better understood through the themes of resistance and collaboration. Furthermore, the book argues that British enactment of laws pertaining to the management of religions in the post-war period had dispossessed religious minorities of their perceived religious rights.As a result, outbreaks of mass violence and continual grievances ensued in the final years of British colonial rule in Southeast Asia - and these tensions still pertain in the present. This book will be of interest to scholars and students of law and society, history, Imperial History and Asian Studies, and to anyone studying minorities, and violence and recovery.
  

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Contents

A
1
B
11
C
25
D
75
E
96
F
104
G
118
H
127
P
187
R
232
S
249
T
272
U
280
V
282
W
287
Y
289

I
139
J
154
M
160
N
173
O
184
Z
292
References
311
Index
341
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Tim Newburn is Professor of Criminology and Social Policy, and Head of Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He is the author or editor of 35 books, the most recent of which are The Sage Handbook of Criminological Theory (edited with Eugene McLaughlin, 2010) and The Eternal Recurrence of Crime and Control (edited with David Downes and Dick Hobbs, Clarendon Press, 2010). Tim was previously the editor of the journal Policy Studies, and was the founding editor of the Sage journal Criminology and Criminal Justice. He is a former Director of the Mannheim Centre for Criminology at the LSE and a past President of the British Society of Criminology. Tim s primary research interests have been in crime and criminal justice policy, the sociology and governance of policing and security, disadvantaged and disaffected young people, youth crime and youth justice, drugs and alcohol, and comparative criminal justice policy-making and policy transfer. He has recently been involved in a study of the August 2011 English riots. An innovative project which aimed to undertake high quality social research at a speed and in a way that maximised opportunities for influencing public debate, Reading the Riots was run jointly with The Guardian, and its initial results were published in their entirety in the newspaper. Currently, together with Professors David Downes and Paul Rock, Tim is currently engaged in researching and writing of an Official History of Post-war Criminal Justice.

Peter Neyroud joined Hampshire Constabulary (1980) and served in all ranks up to Detective Superintendent. He was ACC and DCC in West Mercia, Chief Constable of Thames Valley and Vice-President of ACPO. He became CEO and Chief Constable of the National Policing Improvement Agency (2006-2010). In 2011 he carried out a fundamental Review of Police Leadership and Training. /par1//par1/He is Editor of the Oxford Journal of Policing and Associate Editor of the Springer Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice.

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