Dictionary of Policing

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Professor of Criminology and Social Policy and Director Mannheim Centre for Criminology Tim Newburn, Tim Newburn, Peter Neyroud
Routledge, Jun 17, 2013 - Social Science - 384 pages
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Contemporary policing is developing rapidly and is becoming increasingly professionalized. For practitioners National Occupational Standards, Skills for Justice and the the new PDLP (Police Development and Leaning Programme) have brought a new emphasis on skills, standards and knowledge. Training for police officers and civilian staff working in policing is being significantly upgraded. At the same time it has become more rigorous, with universities and other higher educational institutions playing an increasingly important part in police training - as well as expanding the range of policing courses for undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Key features:

  • approximately 300 entries (of between 500 and 1500 words) on key terms and concepts arranged alphabetically
  • designed to meet the needs of both students and practitioners
  • entries include summary definition, main text and key texts and sources
  • takes full account of emerging occupational and Skills for Justice criteria
  • edited by the UK's leading academic expert on policing and the Chief Executive of the National Policing Improvement Agency
  • Entries contributed by leading academic and practitioners in policing
  

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Contents

A
1
B
11
C
25
D
75
E
96
F
104
G
118
H
127
P
187
R
232
S
249
T
272
U
280
V
282
W
287
Y
289

I
139
J
154
M
160
N
173
O
184
Z
292
References
311
Index
341
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

Tim Newburn is Professor of Criminology and Social Policy, and Head of Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He is the author or editor of 35 books, the most recent of which are The Sage Handbook of Criminological Theory (edited with Eugene McLaughlin, 2010) and The Eternal Recurrence of Crime and Control (edited with David Downes and Dick Hobbs, Clarendon Press, 2010). Tim was previously the editor of the journal Policy Studies, and was the founding editor of the Sage journal Criminology and Criminal Justice. He is a former Director of the Mannheim Centre for Criminology at the LSE and a past President of the British Society of Criminology. Tim s primary research interests have been in crime and criminal justice policy, the sociology and governance of policing and security, disadvantaged and disaffected young people, youth crime and youth justice, drugs and alcohol, and comparative criminal justice policy-making and policy transfer. He has recently been involved in a study of the August 2011 English riots. An innovative project which aimed to undertake high quality social research at a speed and in a way that maximised opportunities for influencing public debate, Reading the Riots was run jointly with The Guardian, and its initial results were published in their entirety in the newspaper. Currently, together with Professors David Downes and Paul Rock, Tim is currently engaged in researching and writing of an Official History of Post-war Criminal Justice.

Peter Neyroud joined Hampshire Constabulary in 1980 after reading History at Oxford. After working in uniform and as a detective in Hampshire and then as an Assistant Chief and Deputy in West Mercia, he became the Chief Constable of Thames Valley in 2002 and a Vice-President of the Association of Chief Police Officers in 2005. He moved to the Home Office in 2006 to set up the National Policing Improvement Agency and was the Chief Constable and Chief Executive until 2010. He was also a member of the Sentencing Guidelines Council, Parole Board, National Policing Board and National Criminal Justice. Before retiring from the police in 2010, he completed a fundamental review of Police Leadership and Training for the Home Secretary, which was published in April 2011 and proposed radical change to the training and development of police officers and the establishment of a new professional body for policing. Since leaving the Police Service at the end of 2010 he has set up his own professional research consultancy, is directing a major research programme at Cambridge University into Crime Harm and is providing training, leadership development and consultancy nationally and internationally. He is also a widely published author of books, articles and papers on policing and Editor of the Oxford Journal of Policing and Associate Editor of the Springer Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. He was awarded the Queens Police Medal in 2004 and a CBE in the Queen s Birthday Honours List in 2011.

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