Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1868 - Zoology
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 436 - Annals of the Lyceum of Natural "History of New York,
Page 636 - ... inches from the tip of the beak to the end of the tail when spread as far as possible flat.
Page 232 - ... the diameter of the eye is one-fifth of the length of the head ; the...
Page 132 - There are a sort of men, whose visages Do cream and mantle like a standing pond; And do a wilful stillness entertain, With purpose to be dress'd in an opinion Of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit; As who should say, ' I am Sir Oracle, And, when I ope my lips, let no dog bark!
Page 411 - seals' food' is found more plentiful in some latitudes than in others, but in all parts of the Greenland sea, from Iceland to Spitzbergen ; I have seen the sea at some places literally swarming with them. Again, in the summer in Davis's Strait I have found in their stomach remains of whatever species of small Fish happened to be just then abundant on the coast, such as the Mallotus arcticus, Salmo (various species), etc.
Page 541 - blowing," and, though purposely observing it, could never see that it ejected from its nostrils anything but the ordinary breath a fact which might almost have been deduced from analogy. In the cold Arctic air this breath is generally condensed, and falls upon those close at hand in the form of a dense spray, which may have led seamen to suppose that this vapour wns originally ejected in the form of water.
Page 433 - It has been killed several times on the British coast ; and I suspect that it is not an unfrequent visitor to our less-frequented shores. Perhaps not a few of the "Sea-horses" and 'Sea-cows" which every now and again terrify the fishermen on the shores of the wild western Scottish lochs, and get embalmed among their folklore, may be the Walrus.
Page 433 - It has been found as far north as the Eskimo live or explorers have gone. On the western shores of Davis's Strait, it is not uncommon about Pond's, Scott's, and Home Bays, and is killed in considerable numbers by the natives. It is not now found in such numbers as it once was ; and no reasonable man who sees the slaughter to which it is subject in Spitzbergen and elsewhere can doubt that its days are numbered. It has already become extinct in several places where it was once common. Its utter extinction...
Page 577 - Sponge irregularly dichotomously branched, more or less expanded on a plane from a single base; of a dark brown colour, of a uniform, hard, horny substance; stem hard, dark brown, solid; base dilated, rather compressed, of a uniform rigid somewhat spongy texture, with a velvety surface, which is formed of an abundance of very minute, cylindrical, tortuous grooves. The branches and branchlets tapering, formed of a...
Page 431 - It became exceedingly irritated if a newspaper was shaken in its face, when it would run open-mouthed all over the deck after the perpetrator of this literary outrage. When a 'fall'* was called it would immediately run at a clumsy rate (about one and a half or two miles an hour), first into the surgeon's cabin, then into the captain's (being on a level with the quarterdeck), apparently to see if they were up, and then out again, grunting all about the deck in a most excited manner 'awuk! awuk.

Bibliographic information