Hortus Woburnensis: A Descriptive Catalogue of Upwards of Six Thousand Ornamental Plants Cultivated at Woburn Abbey ... (Google eBook)

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J. Ridgway, 1833 - Gardens - 440 pages
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[First edition] and richly illustrated work giving insight to how exotic botany, including plants from Australia and the Pacific, was being cultivated in an English grand private house.
  

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Page 270 - ... every period of its growth, in flower, or out of flower, and of every size and age ? Suppose an individual had the penance imposed...
Page 368 - В. (see Section,) attached to each boiler, one near the top, and the other at the bottom ; the upper pipe is round, until it reaches the front of the house, when it forms a square of 12 inches broad by four inches in diameter ; the lower pipe is circular, and four inches in diameter. These pipes convey the water from the boilers across the ends, and along the front of the house to the reservoirs DD...
Page 262 - Plants, is sandy loam, consisting of the sward from a pasture, which should be thrown into a heap, to decompose and pulverize for a short time previous to using ; to which a portion of peat soil, mixed with it, will be a suitable compost for the growth of most tropical plants. When there is a scarcity of peat, a mixture of decomposed tree-leaves may be applied in its stead, with great advantage. Should the soil not be of a naturally sandy quality, a little sand should be intermixed, so as to render...
Page 368 - There are two pipes (b,b, see section) attached to each boiler, one near the top, and the other at the bottom ; the upper pipe is round, until it reaches the front of the house, where it forms a square of twelve inches broad by four inches diameter.
Page 271 - May, or beginning of June, the plants may be turned out of doors, and placed in a situation where they can have the benefit of the morning and evening sun, but sheltered from the westerly winds, and scorching effects of the sun's rays, in the middle of the day ; and arranged so, as that a free circulation of air can readily pass * amongst the whole collection, which will prevent their being drawn up in a weak or languid state, as is frequently the case when crowded. The scarcer, and more delicate...
Page 263 - ... is a scarcity of peat, a mixture of decomposed leaves of trees may be applied in its stead, with great advantage. Should the soil not be of a naturally sandy quality, a little sand should be intermixed, so as to render it light and free for the roots to run in. The pots in which they grow, must be well drained with small pieces of potsherds, or any other material that will permit a free passage for the superfluous moisture. There should be placed next the drainage, a little of the rough fibrous...
Page 274 - Cape, and saved frum those plants that perfect their seeds in the heathery or greenhouse, in this country, collected as they ripen, and a general sowing made in the ensuing February, or March. The pots intended for the seeds should be filled about half full with the drainage, and the remaining space with the soil, which should be intermixed, so as it may consist of half peat and half sand, finely sifted, for the depositing of the seeds, and rendered perfectly level, when the seeds may be sown, but...
Page 262 - ... apartments that are allotted for their cultivation. The soil that appears most appropriate for the growth of the greater portion of stove plants, is sandy loam, consisting of the sward from a pasture, which should be thrown together in a heap, to decompose and...
Page 371 - Pine plants each ; the atmosphere of the house may be kept regularly from 60 to 65 degrees, in the severest weather, without consuming more than three-fourths of a bushel of coals to each division ; or a bushel and a half to the two compartments. The fermenting leaves in the pits also assist in keeping up this temperature. The pipes, boilers, and reservoirs in each, contain about 140 gallons of water; when the fires are first lighted to the Pinery, the furnaces, &c. being then cold and damp, it takes...
Page 256 - ... until we are thoroughly convinced that there is no chance of any of the remaining seeds .coming up. As soon as the seedling plants appear above ground, they should be carefully watered with a fine rose watering pot ; and when, they get a little advanced in their growth, should be potted off into small pots, and replaced in a frame, where they can be shaded and attended with water, until they get established in their pots, and are hardened by degrees to the temperature of the green-house, to which...

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