Medieval Wales

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 28, 1990 - History - 235 pages
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This book provides an introduction to the history of medieval Wales, with particular emphasis on political developments. It traces the growth of Welsh princely power, and the invasion and settlement of Welsh territories by Norman adventurers which resulted in the creation of the marcher lordships and the steady erosion of Welsh princely authority in the south. The subsequent development of a powerful Welsh state under the leadership of the princes of Gwynedd was checked by Edward I in 1277, and thereafter the principality was deliberately overrun and destroyed: the Edwardian castles are symbols of conquest. Despite valiant attempts by local leaders in the thirteenth century, and by a national leader Owain Glyn Dwr early in the fifteenth, the English domination of Wales persisted, even beyond the advent of the Tudor dynasty. This is the first comprehensive short textbook on medieval Wales to be written for school and university students. It will also attract anyone with a general interest in Celtic studies or in the centuries which played such a formative role in the development of the Welsh national character.
  

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Review: Medieval Wales

User Review  - Huw Winston - Goodreads

Great source of information but very dry. Read full review

Contents

IV
1
V
20
VI
44
VII
67
VIII
90
IX
111
X
139
XI
165
XII
186
XIII
192
XIV
215
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About the author (1990)

David Walker was born in or near Wilmington, North Carolina, the son of a slave father and a free black mother (thus, under the laws of slavery, he was born free). the year of his birth is uncertain, although the most convincing recent research contends that it was 1796 or 1797. By his own account in the "Appeal," Walker left Wilmington as a young man and wandered around the United States, residing for an unspecified period in Charleston, South Carolina. In 1825, he turned up as a used-clothes dealer in Boston, where he would spend the rest of his abbreviated life. He died suddenly in 1830.
Sean Wilentz is the Cotsen Fellow and professor of history at Princeton University. His books include "Chants Democratic" and, with Paul E. Johnson, "The Kingdom of Matthias,"

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