Peace Process: American Diplomacy and the Arab-Israeli Conflict Since 1967

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Brookings Institution Press, 2001 - Political Science - 488 pages
2 Reviews
At various times in recent years, the Arab-Israeli conflict has seemed to be moving toward resolution, propelled forward by impressive acts of statesmanship. At other moments, the parties to the conflict seem hopelessly mired in fear and violence, unable to bridge the gaps that separate them. One message of Peace Process is that the United States has had, and will continue to have, a crucial role in helping Israel and her Arab neighbors reach peace. If American presidents play their role with skill, they can make a lasting contribution. But just as likely, they may misread the realities of the Middle East and add to the impasse by their own errors.

This new edition of Peace Process brings the story up to date through the crucial Israeli election of May 1999. Two new chapters on the Clinton Administration have been added. The text has been streamlined and revised and new sources have been consulted, resulting in a compact, authoritative, and timely version of this classic study of American diplomacy in the Middle East. Related documentary material is available on easily accessible Web sites that will be kept current for students and scholars.

Copublished with the Brookings Institution

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I really loved the chapters on Nixon and Carter Read full review

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About the author (2001)

William B. Quandt is Edward R. Stettinius Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia, and was formerly a senior fellow in Foreign Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution. During the Nixon and Carter years, he served on the staff of the National Security Council and was deeply involved in the first Camp David negotiations, which led to the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty.

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