Sunshine on Putty: The Golden Age of British Comedy from Vic Reeves to the Office

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Harper Perennial, 2004 - Performing Arts - 468 pages
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In the 1990s, British comedy underwent a renaissance—shows like The Royle Family and The Office were hugely popular with critics and audiences alike. Just as sports, art, and literature seemed to move towards light entertainment, the comedy on the nation's televisions gave us a clear picture of what was happening to our nation. From Ricky Gervais' self-destructive love affair with dairy products to Steve Coogan's suicidal overtaking technique; from the secrets of Vic Reeves' woodshed to Spike Milligan's final resting place, Ben Thompson reveals the twisted beauty of British comedy’s psyche.

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About the author (2004)

Ben Thompson's comedy career began in the winter of 1986-7, reading a photocopied Ronnie Corbett monologue to an audience of angry students. He never performed again, but later took the opportunity to parade his ignorance of the basic principles of stagecraft in front of a national audience as comedy critic of The Independent On Sunday from 1994-97. He has also written profiles of Britain's best known comedians for The Face, GQ, The Independent, Night & Day and The Saturday Telegraph.

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