Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering

Front Cover
Addison-Wesley Professional, 2003 - Computers - 195 pages
23 Reviews

The practice of building software is a “new kid on the block” technology. Though it may not seem this way for those who have been in the field for most of their careers, in the overall scheme of professions, software builders are relative “newbies.”

In the short history of the software field, a lot of facts have been identified, and a lot of fallacies promulgated. Those facts and fallacies are what this book is about.

There's a problem with those facts–and, as you might imagine, those fallacies. Many of these fundamentally important facts are learned by a software engineer, but over the short lifespan of the software field, all too many of them have been forgotten. While reading Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering , you may experience moments of “Oh, yes, I had forgotten that,” alongside some “Is that really true?” thoughts.

The author of this book doesn't shy away from controversy. In fact, each of the facts and fallacies is accompanied by a discussion of whatever controversy envelops it. You may find yourself agreeing with a lot of the facts and fallacies, yet emotionally disturbed by a few of them! Whether you agree or disagree, you will learn why the author has been called “the premier curmudgeon of software practice.”

These facts and fallacies are fundamental to the software building field–forget or neglect them at your peril!

  

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Review: Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering

User Review  - Mohammad Fouad - Goodreads

Timeless book. I guess I would not appreciate it until I gained practical experience in the field. A must read for any senior developer or team leader. Read full review

Review: Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering

User Review  - Philipp - Goodreads

55 'facts' and 10 'fallacies' on the practice of software engineering: from managing, to planning, to programming etc. The structure is always the same, first the fact in one or two sentences, then ... Read full review

Contents

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Copyright

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David West
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About the author (2003)

Robert Glass is the founder of Computing Trends. He has written more than a dozen books on software engineering and on the lessons of computing failures. Robert is trusted by many as a leading authority on software engineering, especially by those who read his columns in Communications of the ACM and IEEE Software. Robert also publishes a newsletter, The Software Practitioner, and speaks frequently at software engineering events.



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