Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 26 (Google eBook)

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Priestley and Weale, 1866 - Astronomy
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Includes lists of additions to the Society's library, usually separately paged.
  

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Page 188 - And Isaiah the prophet cried unto the Lord : and he brought the shadow ten degrees backward, by which it had gone down in the dial of Ahaz.
Page 118 - London in 1850 and was educated at Eton and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated with classical honors in 1871.
Page 166 - ... multiples of the mean angular distance of the moon from the sun, of the mean anomalies of the moon and sun, and of the moon's mean distance from the node ; and the moon's longitude is expressed by means of a series of sines of the same angles, the coefficients of the periodic terms being functions of the ratio of the sun's mean motion to that of the moon, of the eccentricities of the two orbits and of their mutual inclination. Now, if the eccentricity of the earth's orbit be supposed to remain...
Page 217 - It is worthy of notice," remarks Mr. Huggins, " in the case of Sirius and a large number of the white stars, that at the same time that the hydrogen lines are abnormally strong as compared with the solar spectrum, all the metallic lines are remarkably faint.
Page 165 - ... permanent alteration would be produced. In reality, however, the magnitude of the disturbing force by which this inequality is caused, depends in some degree on the eccentricity of the earth's orbit; and as this is continually diminishing, the disturbing forces at equal intervals before and after conjunction will not be exactly equal. Hence the orbit will no longer be symmetrically situated with respect to the line of conjunction, and therefore the effects of the tangential force before and after...
Page 119 - Et virides apio ripae ; tortusque per herbam Cresceret in ventrem cucumis : nee sera comantem Narcissum, aut flexi tacuissem vimen acanthi...
Page 54 - AM the positions, &c. of nearly 280 meteors had been secured. Before this time we knew that we had abundance of observations to determine the radiant point, or points ; and for a space of nearly a quarter of an hour the paths of the meteors among the stars, &c. were not noticed, but their number was simply counted. The result was that at this time meteors of the first class were appearing at the rate of 250 per hour. Now for every meteor observed, there were at the lowest estimation two or three...
Page 190 - Whitehouse's experimental results are perfectly consistent with my theory; but at the same time I wish it to be understood that my ground for saying so, is...
Page 264 - Sun's surface in a small field, and to examine the identical objects with every variety of power, and under circumstances fit for the use of 400 to 600 with advantage. I thus arrived at the decided conviction that these brilliant objects were merely different conditions of the surface of the comparatively large luminous clouds themselves ridges, waves, hills, knolls, or whatever else they might be called differing in form, in brilliancy, and probably in elevation...
Page 165 - ... that this is not strictly true, and he proceeds briefly to point out the manner in which the inequalities of the moon's motion are modified by a gradual change of the disturbing force, so as to give rise to such an alteration of the areal velocity. As an example, he takes the case of the variation, the most direct effect of the disturbing force. In the ordinary theory, the orbit of the moon, as affected by this inequality only, would be symmetrical with respect to the line of conjunction with...

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