Israel and the Post-Zionists: A Nation at Risk

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Shlomo Sharan
Sussex Academic Press, Jan 1, 2003 - History - 261 pages
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Zionism is the embodiment of Jewry's continuity with its national, religious and cultural past. Post-Zionism - anti-Zionism - is the continuation of Jews' objections that emerged alongside Zionism to the rejuvenation of their historic civilization. This book examines the dimensions and implications of the anti-Zionists' struggle against Israel as a Jewish nation. In a strong and documented rebuttal of post-Zionist claims, Zionism's vitality is shown to be pivotal in contemporary debates about Jewry's national and cultural existence, and the future direction of the Israeli state. The continuous debate in Israel about its identity has turned into a dispute over the state's source of authority and society's ethos: who are the composers; what are its values and symbols; and who are the elite who will lead it. Political elections have not resolved these issues. While ideological differences still separate political adversaries and divide political groups from within, post-Zionist practices and outlooks are common to both sides of the political divide. The media sketch these controversies as ideological, but the essence of post-Zionism encompasses a range of values increasingly shared by wider circles of Israeli society. The twelve contributors, well-known Israeli and American scholars, address all aspects of the post-Zionist debate, including: the state's jurisdiction in religious matters; international public opinion and international law in conflict with Israel's national interest; and the relationship between opponents of Jewish national renewal and Arab resistance. This book is published in association with The Ariel Center for Policy Research.

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About the author (2003)

Professor Emeritus Shlomo Sharan is the author of nine books and numerous journal articles. He taught at Tel Aviv University for 34 years, and has served as a visiting professor/research fellow at Stanford, Yale, UCLA and the University of Helsinki

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