The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 12, 2005 - Business & Economics - 384 pages
8 Reviews
Although the importance of the advent of printing for the Western world has long been recognized, it was Elizabeth Eisenstein, in her monumental, two-volume work, The Printing Press as an Agent of Change, who provided the first full-scale treatment of the subject. This edition gives a stimulating survey of the communications revolution of the fifteenth century. After summarizing the initial changes introduce by the establishment of printing shops, it goes on to discuss how printing effected three major cultural movements: the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the rise of modern science. Specific examples show how the use of the new presses enabled churchmen, scholars, and craftsmen to move beyond the limits handcopying had imposed and thus to pose new challenges to traditional institutions.
  

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Review: The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe

User Review  - Mariah - Goodreads

While Eisenstein's argument has some holes including a lack of primary sources, an absolutist stance, and a denial of the continued importance of manuscripts alongside print, my biggest problem with ... Read full review

Review: The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe

User Review  - Goodreads

While Eisenstein's argument has some holes including a lack of primary sources, an absolutist stance, and a denial of the continued importance of manuscripts alongside print, my biggest problem with ... Read full review

Contents

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3
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VIII
102
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About the author (2005)

Elizabeth L. Eisenstein is the Alice Freeman Palmer Professor of History (Emerita) at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is the author of many book and articles, including The Printing Press as an Agent of Change (Cambridge, 1979) and Grub Street Abroad: Aspects of the Eighteenth Century French Cosmopolitan Press (1992). In 2002, she was awarded the American Historial Association's Award for Scholarly Distinction.

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