Hollywood at Your Feet: The Story of the World-famous Chinese Theatre

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Pomegranate Press, 1992 - Hollywood (Los Angeles, Calif.) - 347 pages
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Built by Sid Grauman in 1927, the most famous motion picture palace in the world towers majestically above the 6900 block of Hollywood Boulevard. The Chinese Theatre's Forecourt of the Stars attracts more than two million visitors annually. 

Throughout its history and up to the present day, the theatre has served as a magnet to thousands of fans and tourists who flock to the site daily to view the flamboyant architecture and the historic cement squares in the theatre's forecourt. The footprints, handprints, and signatures of 176 of Hollywood's most famous celebrities have been placed here, plus those of three comedy teams, one group of quintuplets, two robots and a villainous sci-fi character, on ventriloqist's dummy, a radio character, and the world's best known duck.

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Hollywood at your feet: the story of the world-famous Chinese Theatre

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

An attractive cover and reverse of art and photographs encompasses the intriguing history of Sid Grauman's movie palace on Hollywood Boulevard. When The King of Kings opened on May 18, 1927, the ... Read full review

Review: Hollywood at Your Feet: The Story of the World-Famous Chinese Theater

User Review  - Darrell - Goodreads

This book is a virtual encyclopedia of information all surrounding that curious theater over in Hollywood. If you are planning on going there, read this book first. Read full review

Contents

The Story Behind the Book 1619
16
The Footprint Ceremonies 4457
45
The Stars in the Forecourt
59
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Robert Cushman has worked at the BBC as a script editor, drama producer, and a writer and host of music programs. He has directed many plays in the British theatre, including shows in the West End. As a theatre critic, he worked for the Observer for 12 years before joining the "National Post. He has also written articles for numerous publications, including the "New York Times, Saturday Night, and "Toronto Life.

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