The Higher Civil Service in the United States: Quest for Reform

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University of Pittsburgh Pre, Jan 15, 1996 - Political Science - 240 pages
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Every time control of the U.S. presidency is passed from one party to another, the entire top layer of the executive branch changes. Thousands of men and women take down their pictures, pack up their desks, and move back into private life, just as others dust off their pictures and move in. The U.S. stands alone in this respect. Nearly every other advanced democracy is managed-save for elected officials and a few top aides-by an elite cadre of top civil servants selected by highly competitive examinations.

Hudleston and Boyer tell the story of U.S. efforts to develop higher civil service, beginning with the Eisenhower administration and culminating in the passage of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978. Arguing that the highly-politicized U.S. system simply hasn't worked, they examine why and how reform efforts have failed and offer a series of recommendations for the future.

  

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Contents

Introduction
3
I Bureaucratic Elites in History
5
II Background to the Supergrades
21
III The Second Hoover Commissions Proposal
35
IV Circumventing Congress
51
V Nixons Proposal for a Federal Executive Service
73
VI The Making of the Senior Executive Service
93
The Senior Executive Service 19791994
109
VIII Images of the US Higher Civil Service
129
Whither the Senior Executive Service?
146
Notes
165
Bibliography
203
Index
223
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About the author (1996)

Mark W. Huddleston, formerly professor of political science, dean, and associate provost at the University of Delaware, is president of the University of New Hampshire.†

William W. Boyer is Charles P. Messick Professor Emeritus of public administration in the department of political science and international relations at the University of Delaware.

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