The Making of the Modern Admiralty: British Naval Policy-Making, 1805–1927

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 3, 2011 - History
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This is an important new history of decision-making and policy-making in the British Admiralty from Trafalgar to the aftermath of Jutland. C. I. Hamilton explores the role of technological change, the global balance of power and, in particular, of finance and the First World War in shaping decision-making and organisational development within the Admiralty. He shows that decision-making was found not so much in the hands of the Board but at first largely in the hands of individuals, then groups or committees, and finally certain permanent bureaucracies. The latter bodies, such as the Naval Staff, were crucial to the development of policy-making as was the civil service Secretariat under the Permanent Secretary. By the 1920s the Admiralty had become not just a proper policy-making organisation, but for the first time a thoroughly civil-military one.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
1805
6
2 Admiralty reform 18061835
42
3 Decisionmaking at the Admiralty c18061830
80
4 Admiralty administration and decisionmaking c18301868 The Graham Admiralty
116
context and problems 18681885
149
6 Administrative and policymaking responses c 1882 onwards
180
7 Fisher and Churchill and their successors 19021917
213
8 The Naval Staff planning and policy
242
9 Lord Beattys Admiralty
271
Conclusion
306
Appendix I
316
Appendix II
319
Manuscript sources and select bibliography
322
Index
338
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

C. I. Hamilton teaches modern European history at the University of the Witwatersrand. His previous publications include Portsmouth Dockyard Papers, 1852–1869: From Wood to Iron (2005).

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