From Rome to Byzantium AD 363 to 565: The Transformation of Ancient Rome

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Edinburgh University Press, Jan 15, 2013 - History - 337 pages
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Outlines the significant developments in the period AD 363 to 565These centuries witnessed a number of momentous changes in the character of the Roman empire. Most obviously, control of the west was lost during the fifth century, and although parts of the west were reconquered in the sixth century, the empire's centre of gravity had shifted irrevocably to the east, with its focal point now the city of Constantinople. Equally important was the increasing dominance of Christianity not only in religious life, but also in politics, society and culture. A. D. Lee charts these and other significant developments which marked the transformation of Ancient Rome into medieval Byzantium. By no means only a story of decline and fall, it also explores the reasons for the resilience of the east, as well as Rome's legacy to the emerging medieval world.Key features: draws together the threads of 'Roman' history up to this point also points the way forward to the developments, both in the east and the west of the former Roman Empire in the centuries which followed
  

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Contents

The Constantinian inheritance
1
The later fourth century
17
Emperors usurpers and frontiers
19
Towards a Christian empire
39
Old Rome new Rome
57
The long fifth century
79
Generalissimos and imperial courts
81
Barbarians and Romans
110
Economic patterns
223
The age of Justinian
241
Justinian and the Roman past
243
Justinian and the Christian present
264
Justinian and the end of antiquity
286
Chronology
301
List of rulers
304
List of bishops of Rome
307

Church and state piety and power
134
Anastasius and the resurrection of imperial power
159
Romes heirs in the west
178
Longerterm trends
197
Urban continuity and change
199
Guide to further reading
308
Select bibliography of modern works
313
Index
322
Copyright

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About the author (2013)


A. D. Lee is Associate Professor in Classical Studies at the University of Nottingham

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