Being and Time: A Translation of Sein und Zeit

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SUNY Press, 1996 - Philosophy - 487 pages
18 Reviews
The publication of Martin Heidegger's magnum opus, Being and Time, in 1927 signaled an intellectual event of the first order and had an impact in fields far beyond that of philosophy proper. Among the most complex and original analyses of the character of philosophic inquiry and the relation of the possibility of such inquiry to the human situation, Being and Time has long been recognized as a landmark work of the twentieth century. Still provocative and much disputed, Heidegger's text has been taken as the inspiration for a variety of innovative movements in fields ranging from psychoanalysis, literary theory, existentialism, ethics, hermeneutics, and theology. A work that disturbs the traditions of philosophizing that it inherits, Being and Time raises questions about the end of philosophy and the possibilities for thinking liberated from the presumptions of metaphysics. This new translation by Joan Stambaugh, one of Heidegger's students and leading interpreters, takes account of English-language Heidegger research since the first translation of Being and Time in 1962.
  

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Review: Being and Time

User Review  - Arjun Ravichandran - Goodreads

The most important philosophical work of the 20th century, and a text whose influence will still be felt for some centuries to come, I am willing to reckon. Even if you are one of the many detractors ... Read full review

Review: Being and Time

User Review  - Killer Rabbit - Goodreads

Philosophy for Process Engineers Heidegger would have made a great process engineer. Oh sure, the operators in his section of the wafer fab would never have read any of his long winded operating ... Read full review

Contents

The Interpretation of Dasein in Terms
37
The Existential Analytic and the Interpretation
47
and Descartes Interpretation of the World
83
and the Spatiality of Dasein
94
The Spatiality of BeingintheWorld
97
The Spatiality of Dasein and Space
102
The They
107
The Approach to the Existential Question of the Who of Dasein
108
Care as the Being of Dasein
169
The Fundamental Attunement of Angst as an Eminent Disclosedness of Dasein
172
The Being of Dasein as Care
178
Confirmation of the Existential Interpretation of Dasein as Care in Terms of the Preontological Selfinterpretation of Dasein
183
Dasein Worldliness and Reality
186
a Reality as a Problem of Being and the Demonstrability of the External World
187
b Reality as an Ontological Problem
193
Reality and Care
195

Everyday Beingwith
110
Everyday Being Ones Self and the They
118
Beingin as Such
123
A The Existential Constitution of the There
126
Dasein as Understanding
134
Understanding and Interpretation
139
Statement as a Derivative Mode of Interpretation
144
Language
150
B The Everyday Being of the There and the Falling Prey of Dasein
156
Idle Talk
157
Curiosity
159
Ambiguity
162
Falling Prey and Thrownness
164
The Kind of Being of Truth and
208
The Possible BeingaWhole of Dasein
219
How the Existential Analysis of Death Differs from
229
Everyday BeingtowardDeath and
236
The Attestation of Dasein of an Authentic
247
Conscience as the Call of Care
253
The Existential Interpretation of Conscience
266
The Authentic PotentialityforBeingaWhole of Dasein
279
Care and Selfhood
292
The Temporality of Dasein and
304
The Temporal Meaning of
338
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About the author (1996)

Joan Stambaugh is Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Hunter College. She is the author of The Real is Not the Rational, The Finitude of Being, and The Other Nietzsche, all published by SUNY Press.

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