Reading Architectural History

Front Cover
Taylor & Francis, Jan 14, 2004 - Architecture - 256 pages
0 Reviews
Architectural history is more than just the study of buildings. Architecture of the past and present remains an essential emblem of a distinctive social system and set of cultural values and as a result it has been the subject of study of a variety of disciplines. But what is architectural history and how should we read it?

Reading Architectural History examines the historiographic and socio/cultural implications of the mapping of British architectural history with particular reference to eighteenth - and nineteenth-century Britain. Discursive essays consider a range of writings from biographical and social histories to visual surveys and guidebooks to examine the narrative structures of histories of architecture and their impact on perception adn understanding of the architecture of the past. Alongside this, each chapter cites canonical histories juxtaposed with a range of social and cultural theorists, to reveal that these writings are richer than we have perhaps recognised and that architectural production in this period can in interrogated in the same way as that from more recent past - and can be read in a variety of ways.

The essays and texts combine to form an essential course reader for methods and critical approached to architectural history, and more generally as examples of the kind of evidence used in the formation of architectural histories, while also offering a thematic introduction to architecture in Britain and its social and cultural meaning.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

About the author (2004)

Dana Arnold is Professor of Architectural History at the University of Southampton and Director of the Center for Studies in Architecture and Urbanism. Her recent publications include Re-presenting the Metropolis and The Georgian Country House: Architecture, Landscape and Society.

Bibliographic information