The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion

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Wayne State University Press, 1962 - Religion - 381 pages
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In this book, Kaplan enlarges on his notion of functional reinterpretation and then actually applies it to the entire ritual cycle of the Jewish year-a rarity in modern Jewish thought. This work continues to function as a central text for the Reconstructionist movement, whose influence continues to grow in American Jewry.
  

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Contents

CHATTER
1
ish religion in a changing world p 1 2
9
tion p 14 4 The synthesis of incompatible
20
the modern point of view p 25 6 God
34
GOD AS THE POWER THAT MAKES FOR SALVA
40
antithesis of irrevocable fate and absolute evil
61
GOD AS THE POWER THAT MAKES FOR SOCIAL
104
Gods immanence p 106 2 The revaluation
112
source of happiness competition its principal
228
GOD FELT AS A PRESENCE
243
GOD AS THE POWER THAT MAKES
265
The meaning of freedom p 268 2
293
The association of religion with the moral
299
law p 299 2 The Jewish contribution to
306
divine sanction p 311 5 Righteousness to
320
CHAPTER PACE
330

tional one p 126 5 What constitutes the
135
GOD AS THE POWER THAT MAKES FOR
149
p 178
178
GOD IN NATURE AND IN HISTORY
188
CHAPTER PAGE
202
ization after another p 334 3 How Judaism
347
civilization p 347 4 The reconstruction
355
INDEX
369
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bibliovault - The meaning of God in modern Jewish religion
The meaning of God in modern Jewish religion Mordecai Menahem Kaplan Publisher: Wayne State University Press, 1994 ISBN-10: 0-8143-2552-1 (Paper) ...
www.bibliovault.org/ BV.book.epl?BookId=8251

The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion - Mordecai M. Kaplan
Originally published in 1937, The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion is Kaplan's most accessible work. Concentrating on the area of theology, ...
wsupress.wayne.edu/ judaica/ thought/ kaplanmgmjr.htm

Reconstructionist Press - By Mordecai. M. Kaplan
THE MEANING OF GOD IN MODERN JEWISH RELIGION Introduction by Mel Scult. 380 Pages Softcover $16.95 ($15.26) By rooting today’s Jewish religious ideas in the ...
www.jrf.org/ pub/ cat-kaplan.html

Reconstructionist Judaism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In practice, Rabbi Kaplan's books, especially The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion and Judaism as a Civilization are de facto statements of ...
en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/ Reconstructionist_Judaism

343.html
The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion, 17-20. Judaism is a Civilization -- 10/31; 11/2; Judaism as a Civilization, 389-91, 186-208 (skim). ...
js.emory.edu/ BLUMENTHAL/ AJH-MMK.html

Mordecai Kaplan: Biography and Much More from Answers.com
Among his other important books are Judaism in Transition (1936); The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion (1937); The Future of the American Jew (1948) ...
www.answers.com/ topic/ mordecai-kaplan

Leora Faye Batnitzky - Mordecai Kaplan as Hermeneut: History ...
Kaplan's attempt to rethink Jewish theology in terms of liturgical practices, particularly in his The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion, is arguably ...
muse.jhu.edu/ journals/ jewish_social_studies/ v012/ 12.2batnitzky.html

Center for Cultural Judaism - Grants
Mordechai Kaplan, Judaism as a Civlization, The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion, Judaism Without Supernaturalism Contemporary Israeli Literature in ...
www.culturaljudaism.org/ ccj/ scd/ 61

Mongui Maduro Stichting
The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion / Mordecai M. Kaplan. - 3rd pr. - New York : Reconstructionist Press, 1962. - 381 p. ; 22 cm. ...
www.madurolibrary.org/ html/ library/ books/ judaica/ k.html

Mordecai M. Kaplan and Process Theology: Metaphysical and ...
His most important theological work is The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion (1936). Other volumes include The Future of the American Jew. ...
www.religion-online.org/ showarticle.asp?title=2816

About the author (1962)

Kaplan emigrated to the United States from Lithuania at the age of 8. After graduating from Columbia University in 1902, he was ordained a Conservative rabbi by the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, where he taught for the next 50 years. His attempts to adapt Judaism to the modern world, particularly to the American situation, led to the establishment of a new movement, Reconstructionism. He saw Judaism as representing, first and foremost, a religious civilization and proposed a Jewish theology shaped by Jewish experience and Jewish ethics.

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