Public Trust in Medical Research?: Ethics, Law and Accountability

Front Cover
Radcliffe Publishing, 2007 - Medical - 160 pages
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It has been claimed by fertility experts that embryos can be screened for 6,000 diseases, thereby the risk of x-linked diseases can be minimised by cherry-picking' male embryos that do not carry the abnormal gene. If medical scientists continue to strive for cures, genetic aberrance in human could be a phenomenon of the past...' This challenging book explores issues of professional integrity and ethics underpinning medical research. It includes real-life case studies where public trust in medical research has been misplaced and encourages medical professionals to adhere to professional codes of conduct and be informed about their decision making process. It is vital reading undergraduate and postgraduate students of students of medicine, law, sociology and social policy, philosophy, health related research and ethics. Practicing researchers in medicine and the pharmaceutical industry, and their managers will find it invaluable. The text provides motivation for academics and educators with an interest in research and governance. Healthcare policy makers and shapers, patient rights groups, campaigners and the general media will find the information enlightening. Over the last four decades, medicine has given hope to many people and saved many lives as a result of the ability of the physicians and surgeons to develop new treatments and innovative surgical techniques. While we can celebrate the success of medical science, we should also critically examine some of these developments against principles and in the light of public opinion.'
  

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Contents

III
1
IV
2
V
5
VI
9
VII
13
VIII
19
IX
22
X
27
XXIX
89
XXX
91
XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XI
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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XLV
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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L
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LI
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LII
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About the author (2007)

Member of the former Retained Organs Commission, Honorary Fellow, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham

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