The Correspondence of Charles Darwin: 1851-1855

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Cambridge University Press, 1989 - Biography & Autobiography - 705 pages
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The correspondence in this volume reveals the two sides of Darwin's life in a new intensity. It opens with a tragedy, the death of Darwin's oldest and best loved daughter, Anne, and goes on to show how Darwin sought relief from his loss through his work, with a single-minded but increasingly weary commitment to the completion of his cirripede monographs. In September 1854, as soon as the final proofs of the last barnacle volume had been returned to the printer, Darwin threw himself into a resumption of his species work. He followed up old ideas by initiating new experiments and establishing a worldwide correspondence that encompassed geographical distribution, variation, and plant and animal breeding. The wealth of letters through 1855 makes evident the frenzy of intellectual activity that followed Darwin's terse announcement in his diary: "Sept. 9th (1854) began sorting notes for Species Theory..." These letters are indispensable for the Darwin scholar both historically and biologically, while they provide the general reader with a fascinating look at the scientist at work.
  

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Contents

Appendixes
535
Bibliography
565
Biographical register and index to correspondents
602

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Page 598 - Geological Observations on the Volcanic Islands visited during the Voyage of HMS Beagle; together with some brief Notices on the Geology of Australia and the Cape of Good Hope; being the second part of the Geology of the Voyage of the Beagle.
Page 597 - WERNER'S NOMENCLATURE OF COLOURS. With Additions, arranged so as to render it highly useful to the Arts and Sciences, particularly Zoology, Botany, Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Morbid Anatomy. Annexed to which are Examples selected from Well-known Objects in the Animal, Vegetable, and Mineral Kingdoms.

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Darwin Correspondence Project - The correspondence of Charles ...
Introduction to The correspondence of Charles Darwin, volume 5: 1851-1855. The correspondence in this volume reveals the main preoccupations of Darwin's ...
www.darwinproject.ac.uk/ content/ view/ 23/ 41/

The Correspondence of Charles Darwin - Cambridge University Press
‘The Calendar of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin is … one of the most important reference books to be published in the twentieth century.’ Isis ...
www.cup.cam.ac.uk/ catalogue/ catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521385640

JSTOR: The Correspondence of Charles Darwin. Volume 6: 1856-1857.
THE CORRESPONDENCE OF CHARLES DARWIN. Vol- ume 6: 1856-1857; Volume 7: 1858-1859, and Sup- plement to the Correspondence 1821-1857. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0033-5770(199403)69%3A1%3C83%3ATCOCDV%3E2.0.CO%3B2-C

The Correspondence of Charles Darwin - Cambridge University Press
The Correspondence of Charles Darwin provides, for the first time, full, authoritative texts of all known and available letters to and from Charles Darwin. ...
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Trends in Ecology & Evolution : Darwin: I wish I were a botanist ...
The Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Volume 13, 1865 edited by Frederick Burkhardt, Duncan M. Porter, Sheila Ann Dean, Samantha Evans, Shelley Innes and ...
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Did Darwin have a copy of Mendel's paper?
The Correspondence of Charles Darwin MANUSCRIPTS ROOM UNIVERSITY LIBRARY CAMBRIDGE CB3 9DR. Telephone and fax: (01223) 333008 working hours only ...
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The Correspondence of Charles Darwin
The Correspondence of Charles Darwin. ... The Correspondence of Charles Darwin. Well, someone had to do it! (Different sizes available, if you're ...
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Darwin and the Copley Medal
Editor, The Correspondence of Charles Darwin. HARLES DARWIN was awarded the Copley Medal by the. council of the Royal Society in November 1864, almost ...
www.aps-pub.com/ proceedings/ 1454/ 411.pdf

Details: The correspondence of Charles Darwin by Charles Darwin ...
All about Details: The correspondence of Charles Darwin by Charles Darwin. librarything is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers.
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University of Chicago Press - Darwin's Genesis and Revelations A ...
A Calendar of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, 1821-1882 Frederick Burkhardt, Sydney Smith, David Kohn, William Montgomery; The Correspondence of ...
www.journals.uchicago.edu/ cgi-bin/ resolve?id=doi:10.1086/ 353968

About the author (1989)

Charles Robert Darwin, born in 1809, was an English naturalist who founded the theory of Darwinism, the belief in evolution as determined by natural selection. Although Darwin studied medicine at Edinburgh University, and then studied at Cambridge University to become a minister, he had been interested in natural history all his life. His grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, was a noted English poet, physician, and botanist who was interested in evolutionary development. Darwin's works have had an incalculable effect on all aspects of the modern thought. Darwin's most famous and influential work, On the Origin of Species, provoked immediate controversy. Darwin's other books include Zoology of the Voyage of the Beagle, The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. Charles Darwin died in 1882.

Frederick Burkhardt (1912-2007), the founder of the Darwin Correspondence Project, was president of Bennington College, Vermont, 1947-1957, and president of the American Council of Learned Societies, 1957-1974. Before founding the Darwin Correspondence Project in 1974, he was already at work on an edition of the papers of the philosopher William James. He received the Modern Language Association of America's first Morton N. Cohen Award for a Distinguished Edition of Letters in 1991; the Founder's Medal of the Society for the History of Natural History in 1997, the Thomas Jefferson Gold Medal of the American Philosophical Society in 2003, and a special citation for outstanding service to the history of science from the History of Science Society in 2005.

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