Tintin: The Complete Companion

Front Cover
John Murray, Jan 1, 2001 - Caricatures and cartoons - 205 pages
2 Reviews
This text explains the sources in reality of all the Tintin stories, which still sell four million copies a year worldwide. Politics, people, events and objects are all covered,;Tintin, the extraordinary reporter with his immediately recognizable coif and his dog Snowy, has been a publishing phenomenon since he first appeared in 1928. Herge, Tintin's creator, based the stories on actual events in his world, reflecting the political tensions of the 1930s and postwar events. The Anschluss and the Japanese invasion of Manchuria, the race to the moon, our Western fascination with the Abominable Snowman, the spying activities of Buster Crabbe, the revolutionary activities of Regis Bebray in South America, are just a few of the people, events and phenomena to crop up, inimitably satirized, in Herge's stories. He also drew on real objects: the aircraft, ships, guns, cars, clothes, buildings and so forth, that appear in his stories are scrupulously correct, and were often updated in subsequent editions.;This book explains the sources, of whatever kind, of all the stories. It also shows how Herge subtly adjusted the stories in new editions, adapting them to changing times and ideas, and downplaying their originally local, Belgian origins.

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Tintin (Tintin Characters)

User Review  - Nina Chatterjee - Goodreads

Classic comic series by Belgian artist Hergé, if you are like me and grew up with these, then the stories never get old. Read full review

Review: Tintin (Tintin Characters)

User Review  - D - Goodreads

how to open book? tell me Read full review

About the author (2001)

Michael Farr is a leading British Tintinologist, and an expert on the comic series Tintin and its creator, Herg . He has written several books on the subject as well as translating translating several others into English. Farr was a reporter and foreign correspondent for Reuters and then the Daily Telegraph. He was soon sent to many of the destinations familiar to Tintin, including Africa, the former Soviet Union, and Central and eastern Europe. When based in Brussels, he became acquainted with the creator of Tintin, Herg, and was later to have access to his extensive archives.

Bibliographic information