The Natural Principles of Beauty: As Developed in the Human Figure (Google eBook)

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William Blackwood and Sons, 1852 - Anthropometry - 48 pages
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Page 43 - ... are likewise deduced from the members of the body, such as the digit, the palm, the foot, and the cubit, all of which are subdivided by the perfect number which the Greeks call Teleios.
Page 45 - Since, therefore, the human frame appears to have been formed with such propriety that the several members are commensurate with the whole, the artists of antiquity must be allowed to have followed the dictates of a judgment the most rational, when, transferring to the works of art, principles derived from nature, every part was so regulated as to bear a just proportion to the whole. Now, although these principles were universally acted upon, yet they were more particularly attended to in the construction...
Page 44 - ... of the whole stature. If the length of the face from the chin to the roots of the hair, be divided into three equal parts, the first division determines the place of the nostrils, and the second the point where the eyebrows meet.
Page 21 - That the angles which these lines make with the given line are all simple multiples or submultiples of some given fundamental angle, or bear to it a proportion, admissible under the most simple relations, such as those which constitute the scale of music.
Page 43 - Nature in the composition of the human frame has ordained that the face from the chin to the highest point of the forehead where the hair begins is a tenth part of the whole stature. The same proportion obtains in the hand measured from the wrist to the extremity of the middle finger. The head from the chin to the top of the scalp is an eighth. From the top of the chest to the highest point of the forehead is a seventh. From the nipples to the top of the scalp is a fourth of the whole stature. If...
Page 44 - ... must look for them in those productions which have excited universal admiration. The navel is naturally the centre point of the human body, for if a man should lie on his back with his arms and legs extended, the periphery of the circle which may be described about him, with the navel for its centre, would touch the extremities of his hands and feet. The same affinities obtain if we apply a square to the human figure, for, like the contiguous sides, the height from the feet to the top of the...
Page 44 - The navel is the central point of the human body ; and if a man should lie on his back with his arms and legs extended, the periphery of the circle which might be described around him, with the navel for its center, would touch the extremities of his hands and feet. The...
Page 22 - That the contour is resolved into a series of ellipses of the same simple angles. And, 4th, that these ellipses, like the lines, are inclined to the first given line by angles which are simple submultiples of the given fundamental angle.
Page 45 - ... principles derived from nature, every part was so regulated as to bear a just proportion to the whole. Now, although these principles were universally acted upon, yet they were more particularly attended to in the construction of temples and sacred edifices, the beauties or defects of which were destined to remain as a perpetual testimony of their skill or of their inability.
Page 44 - From the nipples to the top of the scalp is a fourth of the whole stature. If the length of the face from the chin to the roots of the hair be divided into three equal parts, the first division determines the place of the nostrils, the second the point where the eyebrows meet. (The...

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