Popular British ornithology (Google eBook)

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Reeve, 1849 - 324 pages
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Page 30 - The males of song birds, and many others, do not in general search for the female, but, on the contrary, their business in the spring is to perch on some conspicuous spot, breathing out their full and amorous notes, which, by instinct, the female knows, and repairs to the spot to choose her mate.
Page 30 - ... love-laboured song before the females arrive. No sooner do they make their appearance than dreadful battles ensue, and their notes are considerably changed : sometimes their song is hurried through without the usual grace and elegance; at other times modulated into a soothing melody. The first we conceive to be a provocation to battle on the sight of another male ; the last an amorous cadence, or courting address.
Page i - Popular British Ornithology ; Containing a Familiar and Technical Description of the Birds of the British Isles. By PH GOSSE. Second Edition. In twelve chapters, each being the ornithological lesson for the month. With 20 coloured plates. Royal 16mo, price 10*.
Page 31 - ... courting address. This variety of song lasts no longer than till the female is fixed in her choice, which is, in general, in a few days after her arrival ; and if the season is favourable, she soon begins the task allotted to her sex. " The male now no more exposes himself to sing as before, nor are his songs heard so frequently or so loud ; but while she is searching for a secure place to build her nest in, he is no less assiduous in attending her with ridiculous gestures, accompanied with notes...
Page 11 - It could hardly be supposed that this bird, not larger than a lark, is capable of doing serious injury; yet I this morning witnessed a rick of barley, standing in a detached...
Page 32 - When the callow brood appears he is instantly apprised of it, either by instinct, or by the female carrying away the fragment shells to some distant place. The male is now no more heard in tuneful glee, unless a second brood should force the amorous song again; his whole care and attention is now taken up in satisfying the nutrimental calls of his tender infant race, which he does with no less assiduity than his mate, carrying them food, and returning frequently with the muting of the young in his...
Page 38 - whose amorous warblings from the top of the spruce fir were delightful. Its high and varied notes rival those of the Nightingale himself.
Page 30 - Montagu, and he maintained that the 'males of songbirds and of many others do not in general search for the female, but, on the contrary, their business in spring is to perch on some conspicuous spot, breathing out their full and amorous notes, which, by instinct, the female knows and repairs to the spot to choose her mate.
Page 13 - Thou, simple bird, Of all the vocal quire, dwell'st in a home The humblest ; yet thy morning song ascends Nearest to heaven...
Page 13 - Like its relative, this species sings as it soars, - high in air, and poised upon its wings, Unseen the soft, enamour'd Woodlark sings ;" but it pours forth its clear flute-like melodies, also, when perched upon the topmost twig of a tree.

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