Red Scare: FBI and the Origins of Anticommunism in the United States, 1919-1943

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Museum Tusculanum Press, 2000 - Political Science - 391 pages
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The anticommunist crusade of the FBI and its legendary director J. Edgar Hoover during the McCarthy era and the Cold War has attracted much attention from historians, but little is known about the Bureau's political activities during its formative years. This book breaks new ground by tracing the roots of the FBI's political surveillance to the involvement of the Bureau's predecessor, the Bureau of Investigation (BI) in the nation's first period of communist-hunting, the "Red Scare" after World War I. The book is based on the first systematic and comprehensive use of the early BI files from 1908 to 1922, which have only survived on difficult-to-read microfilms deposited in the National Archives, as well as numerous collections of personal papers. The FBI's political surveillance was an integrated part of the attempt by the modern federal state, to regulate and control any organized opposition to the political, economic and social order, such as organized labor, radical movements and African-American protest. The detailed reconstruction of the BI's role in the Red Scare during 1919-1920 show that federal intelligence officials played a crucial role in initiating the anticommunist hysteria in the United States. Even though the staff was small, the BI was able to dramatically influence national events through various methods including using Congressional committees to spread its message.
  

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Contents

Introduction The FBI and the Politics of Anticommunism
9
The Literature on the FBI
10
Theories on the Development of the FBIs Political Role
14
The Theses
18
The Sources
20
The Origins of the Red Scare
24
An Apathetic Opinion
28
The Business Offensive
32
The Surveillance of Black Radicals
195
Strikebreaking
204
Protecting the National Economy
212
The Boston Police Strike
216
The Steel Strike
218
The Coal Strike
227
The Surveillance of Organized Labor
234
The Palmer Raids Deporting Political Ideas
236

The Patriotic Right
35
The Sensationalistic Press
36
The States Crack Down
38
The Search for Order
40
The Bureau of Investigation and the Administrative State
43
The Federalization of Political Surveillance
50
Controlling the Aliens
55
The Betrayal of the Blacks
59
The War Against Radical Labor
69
The Wilson Administration and the Red Scare
72
The Bureau and the Red Scare
83
The Personification of Social Unrest
86
The Bureau Network and Political Associationalism
95
The Bureau and the Patriotic Right
96
The Bridgman Affair
102
The Centralia Massacre
105
The Destruction of the World War Veterans
109
The Bureau and the States
115
The Bureau and the Lusk Committee
123
Constructing the Red Scare
126
The Overman Committee
136
Keeping the Files Up to Date
146
The Bombscare of 1919
148
The Bureau and Congress
152
Organizing the Red Scare
158
1919 Containing the Social Unrest
167
Defending the Racial order
179
The Red Summer of 1919
183
The Poindexter Resolution
237
The Origins of the Deportation Campaign
244
A Vigorous and Comprehensive Investigation
251
Banishing Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman
257
The URW Raids
262
Publicizing the Radical Menace
271
The Sedition Bill
276
To Protect the Governments Interests
278
The January 1920 Raids
290
The Decline and Fall of the Red Scare
300
The Labor Department Insurrection
301
The Bureau Strikes Back
308
In Defense of Civil Liberties
312
Congress Investigates
313
The Bureau Oversteps the Line
317
Aftermath The FBI and Presidential Politics
324
The Bureau and the Origins of White House Intelligence 192133
331
The Threat From the Right
340
The Dies Committee 193843
349
A Suicide Squad Against the Fifth Column
355
The FBI and Political Surveillance From the Red Scare to the Cold War
361
The FBI and the Federalization of Political Surveillance 191943
362
FBI and the Second Red Scare
365
The Most Dangerous Agency in the Country
368
Abbreviations
369
Bibliography
370
Copyright

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References to this book

The FBI: A History
Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones
No preview available - 2007
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