Minutes of Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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The Institution, 1848 - Civil engineering
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Page 37 - Flint glass, called by the French " cristal," from its resemblance to real crystal, is composed of silex (whence the English name), to which is added carbonate of potash and litharge, or red lead ; to which latter material is owing, not only its great specific gravity, but its superior lustre, its ductility, and power of refraction. It is necessary for optical purposes that flint glass should be perfectly free from...
Page 138 - It resisted uninjured the shocks of the great earthquake in that year, although it was observed to oscillate considerably. The most conspicuous part of the work is that which crosses the Valley of Alcantra...
Page 69 - ... without the usual corresponding increase of weight. Mr. George Mills, from his experience as a ship-builder, at Glasgow, was enabled to confirm all that Mr. Seaward had advanced. On the Clyde, the employment of an excess of power in steam vessels had been carried to the greatest extent, without producing corresponding advantages, either for speed, or in a commercial point of view. It would appear that the same error had to a certain degree been committed on the Thames, but less than on the Clyde...
Page 59 - The attention of the meeting having been called to M. D'Harcourt's artificial granite for railways, blocks, and other purposes, Mr. Rastrick remarked that he had about a month ago laid down blocks of the Scotch Asphalte, two feet square, on a portion of the Southampton Railway. The sleeper was put in while the block was formed. It was usual to bore holes and to fix the chairs by bolts ; he had wished to ascertain how far the blocks would stand the driving in of the bolts, without any boring; they...
Page 60 - The following .experiments were performed with a cast-iron lever, 11 feet long, multiplying the strain ten times, with a screw adjustment at the head, and a counterpoise. The sheets of iron and copper which were experimented upon, were placed between two perforated steel plates, and the punch, the nipple of which was perfectly flat on the face, being inserted into a hole in the upper plate, was driven through by the pressure of the lever. The average results of the several experiments (which are...
Page 4 - He shall have been regularly educated as a Civil Engineer according to the usual routine of pupilage, and have had subsequent employment for at least five years in responsible situations as Resident Engineer, or otherwise, in some of the branches defined by the Charter as constituting the profession of a Civil Engineer ; or...
Page 139 - Lisbon, and empties itself into the reservoir at its termination. This reservoir is 60 feet long, by 54 feet wide, and 27 feet deep. The quantity of water contained in it, when the author took the measurements, was 64,800 cubic feet. He was unable to obtain a section of the retaining walls, but supposed them to be about 23 feet in thickness. The pipes through which the water is distributed to the neighbouring fountains, are of earthenware and stone, set in mortar. The velocity of its flow through...
Page 64 - British Queen" steamer, although of two thousand tons measurement, is capable of carrying more than five hundred tons of cargo, when the fuel is on board. The author then examines the question of employing too much power in a steam vessel, and refers to the " Liverpool," as an instance that such may be the fact.
Page 159 - The only deviation made from the exact average was such as might be necessary to avoid the great inconvenience of small fractional parts in the number of threads to the inch. The scale was afterwards extended to six inches.
Page 78 - ... of about four tons weight appended to each ; these weights would hold the chains sufficiently extended to enable them to resist the lateral action of the strongest winds without their being so rigid as to endanger any part of the structure. By this contrivance the platform would be kept firm, which was the chief point to be attained. In all suspension bridges the roadways had been made too flexible, and the slightest force was sufficient to cause vibration and undulation. The platform of the...

References from web pages

Periodici e seriali tecnico-scientifici - Societa - UK
Minutes of proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers, ICE. - London. 2. Journal of the Institution of Civil Engineers. ...
www.unipd.it/ inge/ pubsocuk.htm

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