Right Turn: How the Tories Took Ontario

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Dundurn, 1995 - History - 188 pages
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It wasn't so much a big blue machine that chugged its way across Ontario's political landscape in the spring of 1995 it was more a big purple bulldozer driven by leader Mike harris and a new breed of Tories. Gone were the pinestripes and the cigar-chomping backroom boys of the forty-two years of Tory rule. These Tories were young, hip, and they were riding the wave of their Common Sense Revolution, a platform launched a year earlier.

Still, there were only a few who thought the PCs stood a chance of winning the Ontario provincial election. Though Bob Rae's NDP government was foundering, Lyn McLeod and the Liberals were holding what looked like a steady two-to-one lead in the polls. Rlying on a combination of video tapes, clever advertising, and a brilliant campaign plan, the Harris team turned it all around, pulling off one of the most stunning upsets in Canadian political history.

Right Turn tells the story.

  

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Contents

Coronation to Revolution
1
A House Divided
5
No Cents and Common Sense
9
Out of the Smoke
16
Dont Underestimate This Guy
20
Beyond the Big Blue Machine
30
Just Call Me Janet
36
Dial 1800668MIKE
41
The Young and the Hip
101
A Blue Lady in a Red Outfit
107
Shout at Your Spouse Lose the Election
111
Playing the Percentages
114
The Dreaded Red Book
122
Landslide Ernie
128
Whatever Happened to the Liberals?
136
Political Orphans
159

Sex Halftruths and Videotape
46
Mussel Power
55
Hey Presto Reform Vanishes
64
This Bus Was a Gas
68
Closet Politics
78
Trust Me I Can Do It
95
With the Greatest of Respect
97
Free Spirits
169
You Say You Want a Revolution?
171
The Writ Drops
177
Red Book versus Revolution
182
Illustrations 8394 and 14958
185
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Christina Blizzard has worked for the Toronto Telegram and the London Guardian, and for the past eight years has been a political columnist for the Toronto Sun.

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