The outsider

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Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam, 1982 - Philosophy - 302 pages
15 Reviews
The Outsider is the seminal work on alienation, creativity, and the modern mind-set. First published more than thirty years ago, it made its youthful author England's most controversial intellectual. The Outsider is an individual engaged in an intense self-exploration-a person who lives at the edge, challenges cultural values, and "stands for Truth." Born into a world without perspective, where others simply drift through life, the Outsider creates his own set of rules and lives them in an unsympathetic environment. The relative handful of people who fulfilled Wilson's definition of the Outsider in the 1950s have now become a significant social force, making Wilson's vision more relevant today than ever. Through the works and lives of various artists-including Kafka, Camus, Eliot, Hemingway, Hesse, Lawrence, Van Gogh, Nijinsky, Shaw, Blake, Nietzsche, and Dostoyevski-Wilson explores the psyche of the Outsider, his effect on society, and society's effect on him. Wilson illuminates the struggle of those who seek not only the transformation of Self but also the transformation of society as a whole. The book is essential for everyone who shares Wilson's conviction that "a new religion is needed."

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Review: The Outsider

User Review  - Eric - Goodreads

It is impossible for me to be objective about this book as it had such an influence on my life! I read it when I was 21 and identified with the outsider theme. It had me reading most of the books this ... Read full review

Review: The Outsider

User Review  - Emadeddin - Goodreads

description “The Outsider wants to cease to be an Outsider.” It's like the most touching words (regarding the outsider subject) I've ever read. Yes. This book touches my heart really deep. It ... Read full review

Contents

Foreword by Marilyn Ferguson
xi
THE OUTSIDER TWENTY YEARS On
xv
The Country of the Blind
11
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

Colin Wilson was born on 26 June 1931, in Leicester, England. He considered himself a genius, a born writer, and an outsider, and left school at the age of sixteen. During the next few years he drifted and traveled around England and Continental Europe. After a six-month period in the Royal Air Force, he held a succession of factory, office, hospital, and dishwashing jobs in both London and Paris, worked on the Paris Review, and began to write plays, short stories, essays, and poetry. He met Alfred Reynolds, and became involved in the The Bridge, a quasi-anarchist organization partly composed of ex-Nazi prisoners of war. Wilson was eventually banned from Bridge meetings because his Outsider beliefs were at odds with Reynolds' Anarchist beliefs. Wilson entered into the literary scene with the publication of The Outsider in 1956 when he was 24 years old. The book was grouped with the English version of the Beats. An enormously prolific writer, having written to date over 80 major works on a wide variety of subjects: philosophy, religion, occult and supernatural phenomenea, music, sex, crime and critical theory. His biographies include works on Bernard Shaw, David Lindsay, Herman Hesse, Wilhelm Reich, Jorge Luis Borges, Ken Russell, Rudolph Steiner, Aleister Crowley, and P. D. Ouspensky. Wilson made major philosophical statements in the Outsider Series including, The Outsider, Religion & the Rebel, The Stature of Man, The Strength to Dream, Origins of the Sexual Impulse, Beyond the Outsider and Essay On the New Existentialism. Wilson spent several years in the 1960s as a writer in residence at Hollins College, Virginia.

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