Who Do You Think You Are?

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Pan Macmillan, Jul 6, 2011 - Fiction - 456 pages
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In seven short stories Malcolm Bradbury takes a subtly ironic look at a variety of targets: American academics, provincial Britain, the aspirations of social workers, psychologists, the well-intentioned. . .

In addition he delights us with an irreverent and hilarious series of parodies of some of the greatest paradigms of the British and American literary scenes: a passage from Iris Murdoch's little-known The Sublime and the Ridiculous; Muriel Spark (a whole novel); the fifth volume of Durrell's Alexandria Quartet; John Osborne; J. D. Salinger and many more.

'A very funny book indeed. Malcolm Bradbury is a satirist of great assurance and accomplishment' Observer

'Bradbury's eye is sharp, his trigger-finger steady and unafraid, and his range and explosive power devastating' The Times

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About the author (2011)

Malcolm Bradbury was a well-known novelist, critic and academic. He co-founded the famous creative writing department at the University of East Anglia, whose students have included Ian McEwan and Kazuo Ishiguro. His novels are Eating People is Wrong (1959); Stepping Westward (1965); The History Man (1975), which won the Royal Society of Literature Heinemann Prize; Rates of Exchange (1983), which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize; Cuts (1987); Doctor Criminale (1992); and To the Hermitage (2000). He wrote several works of non-fiction, humour and satire, including Who Do You Think You Are? (1976), All Dressed Up and Nowhere to Go (1982) and Why Come to Slaka? (1991). He was an active journalist and a leading television writer, responsible for the adaptations of Porterhouse Blue, Cold Comfort Farm and many TV plays and episodes of Inspector Morse, A Touch of Frost, Kavanagh QC and Dalziel and Pascoe. He was awarded a knighthood in 2000 for services to literature and died later the same year.

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