The Shaping of Arithmetic after C.F. Gauss's Disquisitiones Arithmeticae: After C.F. Gauss's Disquisitiones Arithmeticae (Google eBook)

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Springer Science & Business Media, Feb 3, 2007 - Mathematics - 590 pages
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The cultural historian Theodore Merz called it 'that great book with seven seals,' the mathematician Leopold Kronecker, 'the book of all books' : already one century after their publication, C.F. Gauss's Disquisitiones Arithmeticae (1801) had acquired an almost mythical reputation. It had served throughout the XIX th century and beyond as an ideal of exposition in matters of notation, problems and methods; as a model of organisation and theory building; and of course as a source of mathematical inspiration. Various readings of the Disquisitiones Arithmeticae have left their mark on developments as different as Galois's theory of algebraic equations, Lucas's primality tests, and Dedekind's theory of ideals. The present volume revisits successive periods in the reception of the Disquisitiones: it studies which parts were taken up and when, which themes were further explored. It also focuses on how specific mathematicians reacted to Gauss's book: Dirichlet and Hermite, Kummer and Genocchi, Dedekind and Zolotarev, Dickson and Emmy Noether, among others. An astounding variety of research programmes in the theory of numbers can be traced back to it. The 18 authors - mathematicians, historians, philosophers - who have collaborated on this volume contribute in-depth studies on the various aspects of the bicentennial voyage of this mathematical text through history, and the way that the number theory we know today came into being.
  

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About the author (2007)

Catherine Goldstein is Directrice de recherches du CNRS and works at the Institut de math??matiques de Jussieu (Paris, France). She is the author of "Un th??or??me de Fermat et ses lecteurs" (1995) and a coeditor  of "Mathematical Europe: History, Myth, Identity"(1996). Her research aims at developing a social history of mathematical practices and results, combining close readings and a network analysis of texts. Her current projects include the study of mathematical sciences through World War I and of experimentation in XVII th-century number theory.

Norbert Schappacher is professor of mathematics at Universit?? Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg.His mathematical interests relate to the arithmetic of elliptic curves.But his current research projects lie in the history of mathematics. Specifically, he focuses on the intertwinement of philosophical and political categories with major junctures in the development of mathematical disciplines in the XIX\up{th} and XX\up{th} centuries. Examples include number theory and algebraic geometry, but also medical statistics.

 Joachim Schwermer is professor of mathematics at University of Vienna. In addition, he serves as scientific director at the Erwin-Schroedinger International Institute for Mathematical Physics, Vienna. His research interests lie in number theory and algebra, in particular, in questions arising in arithmetic algebraic geometry and the theory of automorphic forms. He takes a keen interest in the mathematical sciences in the XIX\up{th} and XX\up{th} centuries in their historicalcontext.

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