Witchcraft, Magic and Culture, 1736-1951

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Manchester University Press, Sep 11, 1999 - History - 337 pages
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Most studies of witchcraft and magic have been concerned with the era of the witch trials, a period that officially came to an end in Britain with the passing of the Witchcraft Act of 1736. But the majority of people continued to fear witches and put their faith in magic. Owen Davies here traces the history of witchcraft and magic from 1736 to 1951, when the passing of the Fraudulent Mediums Act finally erased the concept of witchcraft from the statute books. This original study examines the extent to which witchcraft, magic and fortune-telling continued to influence the thoughts and actions of the people of England and Wales in a period when the forces of "progress" are often thought to have vanquished such beliefs.
  

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Contents

EDUCATED ATTITUDES TOWARDS THE POPULAR
1
WITCHCRAFT AND POPULAR JUSTICE
79
WITCHCRAFT MAGIC AND POPULAR LITERATURE
120
THE WITCH
167
OCCULT PRACTITIONERS
214
DECLINING BELIEF IN WITCHCRAFT
271
CONCLUSION
294
INDEX
330
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About the author (1999)

Owen Davies is a cultural historian who has published widely on the subject of witchcraft and magic.

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