How to Build a Mind: Toward Machines with Imagination

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Columbia University Press, 2001 - Computers - 205 pages
4 Reviews

Igor Aleksander heads a major British team that has applied engineering principles to the understanding of the human brain and has built several pioneering machines, culminating in MAGNUS, which he calls a machine with imagination. When he asks it (in words) to produce an image of a banana that is blue with red spots, the image appears on the screen in seconds.

The idea of such an apparently imaginative, even conscious machine seems heretical and its advocates are often accused of sensationalism, arrogance, or philosophical ignorance. Part of the problem, according to Aleksander, is that consciousness remains ill-defined.

Interweaving anecdotes from his own life and research with imagined dialogues between historical figures -- including Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Wittgenstein, Francis Crick, and Steven Pinker -- Aleksander leads readers toward an understanding of consciousness. He shows not only how the latest work with artificial neural systems suggests that an artificial form of consciousness is possible but also that its design would clarify many of the puzzles surrounding the murky concept of consciousness itself. The book also looks at the presentation of "self" in robots, the learning of language, and the nature of emotion, will, instinct, and feelings.

  

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Review: How to Build a Mind: Toward Machines with Imagination

User Review  - Will - Goodreads

A cool philosophical discourse into the idea of machine consciousness. A little dragging at some points, and the chapters bounced around in a weird way, but it all came together in the end very nicely Read full review

Review: How to Build a Mind: Toward Machines with Imagination

User Review  - David - Goodreads

I am passionate about artificial intelligence (and recognize it's limitations). That being said, I found this an interesting read. Easy to finish in a day or two. Good reading if you're on a plane ... Read full review

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Contents

Imagination and Consciousness
1
Where the Dreaming Begins
15
A Voyage
29
An Influence Across
43
Early Artificial Neurons and the Beginnings
57
The Empiricists
71
The First Machines
87
A Brief Interlude
105
Machines with No Mind
113
Starting the Week with Consciousness
127
MAGNUS in South Kensington and Pasadena
141
The Ego in the Machine
161
epilogue
183
further reading
189
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References from web pages

The Posthuman Condition Bibliography
How to Build a Mind: Toward Machines with Imagination. New York, NY: Columbia University Press. Alison, J. (1996). Jam: Style + Music + Media (exhibition ...
www.robertpepperell.com/ Posthum/ biblio.htm

Leonardo, Volume 35 - Table of Contents
How to build a mind: toward machines with imagination. Artificial intelligence. Pepperell, Robert. How to Build a Mind: Toward Machines with Imagination ...
muse.jhu.edu/ journals/ leonardo/ toc/ len35.2.html

How to Build a Mind
How to Build a Mind: Toward Machines with Imagination. Igor Aleksander. Paper, 192 pages, 3 illus ISBN: 978-0-231-12013-5 $24.00 / 14.00. August, 2001 ...
cup.columbia.edu/ book/ 978-0-231-12012-8/ how-to-build-a-mind/ tableOfContents

MIT Press Journals - Leonardo
How to Build a Mind: Toward Machines with Imagination byigor Aleksander. Columbia University Press, New York, NY, 2001. 205 pp. Cloth. $24.95. ...
www.mitpressjournals.org/ toc/ leon/ 35/ 2

INDEX TO BOOKS REVIEWED VOLUME 78 (2003)
521. INDEX TO BOOKS REVIEWED. VOLUME 78 (2003). Entries are by title and author/editor; lead reviews are so designated. Abatzopoulos tj, et al. ...
www.journals.uchicago.edu/ cgi-bin/ resolve?QRB780413

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How to Build a Mind: Toward Machines with Imaginat (How to Build a Mind: Toward Machines with Imagination Libros Ingles Biography & Autobiography General ...
esmas.prml.com.mx/ esmas/ catalogo/ dsp_autor.cfm?autID=35520

About the author (2001)

Igor Aleksander is professor of neural engineering systems at the Imperial College of Science, Technology, and Medicine in London. He has studied artificial intelligence for more than thirty years and has published over 200 papers and ten books on the subject, including Reinventing Man, Impossible Minds: My Neurons, My Consciousness and Neurons and Symbols: The Stuff That Mind Is Made Of.

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