The Ottoman Empire and the World-Economy

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Huri Islamogu-Inan
Cambridge University Press, Jun 7, 2004 - Business & Economics - 481 pages
2 Reviews
This collection of essays represents a departure from the traditional perspective, recently questioned by many scholars, from which Ottoman history is usually written. Central to the establishment of Western domination over the 'East' is the writing of its history in terms of Western hegemony, above all in the case of the Ottoman Empire, which has been characterised as static, irrational and authoritarian in contrast with the dynamic, rational, democratic West. This book contrasts sharply with conventional studies of the Ottoman Empire, based on this European world-view, that focus on political military, and cultural institutions. Following a series of general theoretical discussions about Ottoman social structure, the contributors turn to case studies directed either to theoretical problems or to 'facts' which suggest new avenues of conceptualisation.
  

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Contents

Oriental despotism in worldsystem perspective
1
merchant
27
Agenda for Ottoman history
42
State and economy in the Ottoman Empire
63
The incorporation of the Ottoman Empire into the world
88
a study of peasant
101
The cotton famine and its effects on the Ottoman Empire
160
The Middle Danube culdesac
170
Notes on the production of cotton and cotton cloth in sixteenth
262
a study
271
The silk industry of Bursa 18801914
284
A provisional report concerning the impact of European capital
300
The Venetian presence in the Ottoman Empire 160030
311
A study of the feasibility of using eighteenthcentury Ottoman
345
When and how British cotton goods invaded the Levant markets
374
Motes
384

Commodity production for worldmarkets and relations
178
Primitive accumulation in Egypt 17981882
203
a study in Ottoman
247

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