A Complete Report of the Trial of Dr. E. W. Pritchard: For the Alleged Poisoning of His Wife and Mother-in-law ... (Google eBook)

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Kay, 1865 - Trials (Poisoning) - 134 pages
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Page 72 - Penrith ; and they shall invest in such way and manner, and in such securities or security of such kind as to them shall seem best, the other two-third parts, and pay the interest or annual produce thereof to my daughter, Mary Jane Taylor or Pritchard, spouse of Edward William Pritchard, surgeon in Hunmanby, and that upon her own receipt as alimentary to her, and exclusive of the...
Page 96 - If you answer the first of these questions in the affirmative, and the second and third in the negative, you are then shut up to this other question — Who committed the murder? — for murder, upon the assumption of these answers to the questions I have stated, was committed. It is quite competent for you to find the prisoner...
Page 52 - Douglas on the 24th March. I then subjected these materials to the following examination : — The orange-yellow precipitate was boiled in a tube with pure hydrochloric acid, and the solution thus obtained was mixed with water, when a white precipitate formed. The fluid containing this precipitate was again subjected to a stream of sulphuretted hydrogen gas, and again gave a deposit of an orange-yellow colour. One fluid drachm of the tartaric acid solution was treated by Keinsch's method, and another...
Page 53 - On the other sheet, distinguished by me as No. 2, in a stain obviously of urine, marked by me A. 4th, On a toilet cover, in a stain of a reddish colour, looking like a wine stain. It is...
Page 52 - Reinsch's method, and another fluid drachm was treated by Marsh's process. By each of these well-known methods, and thus operating upon a quantity of fluid corresponding to a forty-second part of the contents of the intestines, I obtained unequivocal evidence of the presence of antimony. By digesting a small quantity of the dried residue of the intestinal contents with distilled water, filtering and subjecting the filtrate to...
Page 132 - Was it conceivable that a girl 16 or 17 years of age, in the position of a servant maid, could have herself conceived or executed such a design ? And if she had conceived it, could she have executed it subject to the vigilance of the husband of her victim, himself a Medical man ? That was very hard to believe indeed. On the other hand, if the prisoner conceived and executed the design, it was not so difficult to believe that Mary M'Leod may have been the perfectly unconscious and innocent instrument...
Page 52 - Littlejohn, to carry on the following preliminary process in my absence. The whole contents of the intestines were evaporated to dryness on a water bath, so as to obtain a solid residue ; one-half of this residue was digested with water acidulated with tartaric acid, and filtered, by which a solution measuring two ounces and five drachms was obtained, in which any antimony present in the intestines would be found. One ounce of this fluid was subjected to a stream of sulphuretted hydrogen gas, and...
Page 59 - That the contents of the intestines contained the largest proportion of antimony, next the heart, then the liver, kidney, and spleen ; less in the stomach ; and the smallest quantity in the rectum, brain, and blood. Not knowing the total weight either of the contents of the intestines, or of the several organs here enumerated, I was unable to calculate the total quantity of antimony in these matters, either separately or conjoined.
Page 125 - I care not for professional etiquette or professional rule. There is a rule of life, and a consideration that is far higher than these — and that is, the duty that every right-minded man owes to his neighbour to prevent the destruction of human life in this world, and in that duty I cannot but say Dr. Paterson failed.
Page 66 - I should have expected to have found some morbid appearances indicative of the irritant nature of the drug. It appears to me more probable, from the amount found in the body, that it must have been taken in a succession of doses, not great enough individually to produce local irritant effects, but amounting in the aggregate to a large quantity. It is right, however, to add that a single copious dose...

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