The Stratigraphy of the Pennsylvanian Series in Missouri (Google eBook)

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H. Stephens printing Company, 1915 - Geology, Stratigraphic - 407 pages
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Page 144 - ... lineatus, Spirifer cameratus, Spiriferina kentuckensis, Chonetes verneuilanus, Hustedia mormoni, Dielasma bovidens and Fusulina cylindrica 12-15 Not far from here is the mouth of the stream which enters just above the falls of Big creek. The rock forming the falls lies probably six to eight feet below the base of the limestone just described. It is about twenty feet thick...
Page ii - BOARD OF MANAGERS. His Excellency, Elliott W. Major, Governor of Missouri, ex officio President of the Board Jefferson City Elias S. Gatch, Vice-President St. Louis Major Clark Craycroft, Secretary Joplin Philip N. Moore St. Louis Edward M. Shepard, Sc. D Springfield Ox) LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.
Page 25 - Haworth, E., and Kirk, MZ, The Neosho river section: Kansas Univ. Quart., vol. 2, p.
Page 6 - ... their thickness at points a considerable distance to the west and compilation of surface measurements does not show accurately the total thickness of the system. However, the record of deep wells indicates that the figures given are approximately correct. Lithologic Character. The Pennsylvanian system is composed of a number of varieties of shale, sandstone, limestone, clay and coal, which, though rather thin in a vertical direction, are unusually persistent horizontally.,= Many of the limestones...
Page 90 - Survey, vol. 12, pt. 2, pp. 123, 210, 270, 331, et al., 1898. named the western channel deposits the Warrensburg sandstone and the eastern the Moberly sandstone and described and mapped about half of each of them in detail. The present writers examined and mapped the remainder of the two larger channels in a reconnaissance way and found detached but similar deposits in other localities. The areal distribution of the main channels is shown on the State geologic map in the back of this volume. In describing...
Page 206 - Pike and neighboring counties and a small part of a northern land mass in the extreme northwestern corner of the State. The western sea continued to advance eastward, while an eastern sea occupying most of Illinois advanced westward. Probably by the end of Cherokee time the two seas had joined, submerging practically all of northern Missouri and possibly nearly all of southern Missouri also. No deposition appears to have taken place at this time in the extreme northwestern corner of the State, for...
Page 14 - The Des Moines formation represents the lower Coal Measures, or the marginal deposits of the upper Carboniferous. It takes its name from the Des Moines river, which flows for more than 200 miles directly through the beds of this terrane. It extends into Missouri, and follows the northern and western boundaries of the Ozark uplift into Kansas and Indian Territory. The Missouri...
Page 13 - stage" to correspond with "the lower Coal Measures, or the marginal deposits of the upper Carboniferous." In 1894 he stated that "the great limestone of Winterset may be regarded as the base of the 'upper' Coal Measures" and that "in Missouri, it appears to be continued in what is known as the Bethany Falls limestone.
Page 3 - ... 3,500 feet in the southern part of the state and a slightly smaller amount to the north. A total thickness of about 3,000 feet has been measured along Kansas river. As the Pennsylvanian rocks have a general dip to the west they are consequently much thinner along the eastern border of their outcrop, where only the older formations have been spared by erosion, and thickest in the counties adjoining the belt of Permian outcrop. Since the dip of the beds is low and the relief of the surface slight,...
Page 32 - I have considered the base of this formation as defined by the top of the Osage coal horizon." This paper dealt with the section near Topeka, Kans., where, at that time, the Osage coal was supposed to be represented by a bed (the Silver Lake) above the Topeka coal. Later Beede2 found the Osage coal to be the equivalent of the Topeka bed. The limestone over the Silver Lake (Elmo) coal was found to be lenticular and Prosser3 re-defined the base of the Wabaunsee as at the bottom of the next limestone...

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