Biographia Juridica: A Biographical Dictionary of the Judges of England from the Conquest to the Present Time, 1066-1870 (Google eBook)

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John Murray, 1870 - Judges - 792 pages
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Page 6 - And he said, Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldest not eat? And the man said, The woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat.
Page 203 - And yet Time hath his revolutions ; there must be a period and an end to all temporal things— -finis rerum, an end of names and dignities, and whatsoever is terrene, and why not of De Vere ? For where is Bohun ? Where is Mowbray ? Where is Mortimer ? Nay, which is more and most of all, where is Plantagenet ? They are entombed in the urns and sepulchres of mortality. And yet let the name and dignity of De Vere stand so long as it pleaseth God!
Page 284 - A few days after they appeared in his presence, armed, and attended with armed followers ; and they accused, by name, the Archbishop of York, the Duke of Ireland, the Earl of Suffolk, Sir Robert Tresilian, and Sir Nicholas Brembre, as public and dangerous enemies to the state.
Page 470 - The Corporation presented him with the freedom of the city in a gold box, in acknowledging which he naturally dwelt on some of the topics that were interesting to a commercial community. He gave a somewhat new view of "Protection" when he called it a remnant of heathenism.
Page 49 - Wisdom for a man's self is in many branches thereof a depraved thing ; it is the wisdom of rats, that will be sure to leave a house somewhat before it fall; it is the wisdom of the fox, that thrusts out the badger who digged and made room for him; it is the wisdom of crocodiles, that shed tears when they would devour ; but that which is specially to be noted is that those which, as Cicero says of Pompey, are sui amantes sine rivali...
Page 175 - To which it was answered by me, that true it was that God had endowed his Majesty with excellent science and great endowments of nature, but his Majesty was not learned in the laws of his realm of England ; and causes which concern the life or inheritance or goods or fortunes of his subjects are not to be decided by natural reason but by the artificial reason and judgment of...
Page 39 - I said : My Lord, I see I must be your homager, and hold land of your gift ; but do you know the manner of doing homage in law ? always it is with a saving of his faith to the King and his other Lords ; and therefore, my Lord...
Page 46 - And for the briberies and gifts wherewith I am charged, when the books of hearts shall be opened, I hope I shall not be found to have the troubled fountain of a corrupt heart, in a depraved habit of taking rewards to pervert justice ; howsoever I may be frail, and partake of the abuses of the times.
Page 46 - But because he that hath taken bribes is apt to give bribes, I will go furder, and present your Majesty with a bribe.
Page 261 - Julian" (that was ever his oath) "I must needs confess, that if the Act of Parliament be not unlawful, then is not the indictment in my conscience insufficient.

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