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Books Books 1 - 10 of 10 on They were all silent. It was Mrs. Wilcox. She approached just as Helen's letter had....  
" They were all silent. It was Mrs. Wilcox. She approached just as Helen's letter had described her, trailing noiselessly over the lawn, and there was actually a wisp of hay in her hands. She seemed to belong not to the young people and their motor, but... "
Howards End - Page 28
by Edward Morgan Forster - 1921 - 393 pages
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The Cave and the Mountain: A Study of E. M. Forster

Wilfred Stone - Literary Criticism - 1966 - 436 pages
...inhabits the house of realism like some ghostly deity. It is Helen who first meets and admires her: She seemed to belong not to the young people and their...it. One knew that she worshipped the past, and that the instinctive wisdom the past can alone bestow had descended upon her— that wisdom to which we...
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Waking Giants : The Presence of the Past in Modernism: The Presence of the ...

Herbert N. Schneidau Professor of English University of Arizona - Literary Criticism - 1991 - 304 pages
...things." They were all silent. It was Mrs. Wilcox. She approached just as Helen's letter had described her, trailing noiselessly over the lawn, and there...it. One knew that she worshipped the past, and that the instinctive wisdom the past can alone bestow had descended upon her — that wisdom to which we...
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E.M. Forster: A Critical Linguistic Approach

1995 - 168 pages
...things.' They were all silent. It was Mrs. Wilcox. She approached, just as Helen's letters had described her, trailing noiselessly over the lawn and there...to the house, and to the tree that overshadowed it. (36) She separated the quarrelling 'human beings', And when they had obeyed her she turned to her elder...
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Constructive Postmodernism: Toward Renewal in Cultural and Literary Studies

Martin Schiralli - Education - 1999 - 163 pages
...manner in which Forster presents Mrs. Wilcox to us sounds a deeply resonant chord: She approached . . . trailing noiselessly over the lawn, and there was...it. One knew that she worshipped the past, and that the instinctive wisdom the past alone can bestow had descended upon her.25 This "instinctive wisdom,"...
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Others

Joseph Hillis Miller - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 284 pages
...and to the immemorial tradition it embodies puts her at the top of the social hierarchy in the novel: "She seemed to belong not to the young people and...it. One knew that she worshipped the past, and that the instinctive wisdom the past alone can bestow had descended upon her — that wisdom to which we...
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Imperial Desire: Dissident Sexualities and Colonial Literature

Philip Holden, Richard R. Ruppel
...attachment to the house and her alignment with nature: "She approached just as Helen's letter had described her, trailing noiselessly over the lawn, and there...to the house, and to the tree that overshadowed it" (Howards End, 18). Though Forster tended to mystify his creative process, Oliver Stallybrass opens...
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Regenerating the Novel: Gender and Genre in Woolf, Forster, Sinclair and ...

James J. Miracky - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 178 pages
...who have hay fever (Finkelstein 101). 1dentified with Howards End from the start, Mrs. Wilcox seems "to belong not to the young people and their motor,...the house, and to the tree that overshadowed it," and possesses "the instinctive wisdom the past can alone bestow" (Howards 22). 1n her reconciliation...
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Play and the Politics of Reading: The Social Uses of Modernist Form

Paul B. Armstrong - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 207 pages
...the claims made for Mrs. Wilcox's mythic status are oddly unpersuasive.4 The narrator asserts that "she seemed to belong not to the young people and...it. One knew that she worshipped the past, and that the instinctive wisdom the past can alone bestow had descended upon her" (18). Undercutting this invocation...
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The Lost Girls: Demeter-Persephone and the Literary Imagination, 1850-1930

Andrew D. Radford - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 356 pages
...Charles's efforts to play the boorish inquisitor: [s]he approached just as Helen's letter had described her, trailing noiselessly over the lawn, and there...it. One knew that she worshipped the past, and that the instinctive wisdom the past can alone bestow had descended upon her - that wisdom to which we give...
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Achievement of E. M. Forster

John Beer - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 174 pages
...things." They were all silent. It was Mrs Wilcox. She approached just as Helen's letter had described her, trailing noiselessly over the lawn, and there...it. One knew that she worshipped the past, and that the instinctive wisdom the past can alone bestow had descended upon her — that wisdom to which we...
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