Indian Renaissance: British Romantic Art and the Prospect of India

Front Cover
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., Jan 1, 2005 - Art - 336 pages
0 Reviews
Indian Renaissance: British Romantic Art and the Prospect of India is the first comprehensive examination of British artists whose first-hand impressions and prospects of the Indian subcontinent became a stimulus for the Romantic Movement in England; it is also a survey of the transformation of the images brought home by these artists into the cultural imperatives of imperial, Victorian Britain. The book proposes a second - Indian - Renaissance for British (and European) art and culture and an undeniable connection between English Romanticism and British Imperialism.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Foreword
vii
List of Illustrations
xi
Color Plates
xvi
The Idea of India Tiger Tree and Cave
33
Tigers of All Stripes
35
The Great Banyan Tree of India
40
The CaveTemple of Elephanta Eroticism and Art
47
The Indian Prospect in English Romantic Art and Literature
55
Imperial Vision The Progress from Cornwallis to Wellesley
167
The View from the Hillforts
176
Thomas Daniell and the Picturesque Possession of India
181
Times are Changed Early and Late Views of Calcutta
183
Travel and Picturesque Possession
189
Oriental Scenery From Bengal to Madras 17957
194
Twelve Singular Antiquities of India 17991800
200
Objects and Scenes of Conquest 18011803
203

Sanskrit Translations for an Indian Renaissance
57
The Ideal of India Ancient India as the Uroffenbarung of the Romantic Era
60
Oriental Fantasies and Indian Prospects
65
Tilly Kettles Theater of India
67
The Dancing Girl of Faizabad
74
Artists and Traders at Oudh
75
Edenic Nights and Everyday Living
80
The Paradise of the Nayars
89
Natural Paradise and Natural History
92
English Romantic Art and the Indian Prospect
101
The Royal Academy and the Prospect of India
103
Patronage of Learning By a GovernorGeneral
108
Hodges Indian Sublime
114
Temple Gloom and Rural Complexity
126
Conversations in Calcutta and Oudh
132
The Legacy of Clive and Hastings
141
Storming Seringapatam The Drama and Romance of Empire
145
Little Boys Lost
147
Romantic Revolutionary Mysore
154
Storming Seringapatam
158
TwentyFour Landscapes Composed Too Perfectly 18041805
205
Singular India 1808
208
Dark Prospects in the Light of Empire
213
Something New The Freaks of Gold
215
Devolution of an Indian Prospect
224
Missionaries of Empire
228
The Imperial Sublime of James Baillie Fraser
234
Savage Forms and Natural Landscapes for the Imperial Traveler
245
DOyly The View from an Elephants Back
257
Elegies to an Indian Renaissance
265
Empire Follows Art The Retrospections of Hodges and Zoffany
267
Blakes Prophecies Against Empire
271
Blakes Indian Epic
280
Turner and the Dragons of Empire
286
George Chinnery The Last Romantic Artist of India
295
The Prospect from a Distance
302
Notes
305
Selected Bibliography
327
Index
333
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

George H. Gilpin is Professor of English at the University of Tulsa, USA. Hermione de Almeida is the Pauline McFarlin Walter Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Tulsa, USA.

Bibliographic information