The Cambridge Old English Reader

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 1, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 532 pages
5 Reviews
This 2004 book is a major reader of Old English, the language spoken by the Anglo-Saxons before the Norman Conquest. Designed both for beginning and for more advanced students, it broke new ground in two ways, first in its range of texts, and second in the degree of annotation it offers. The fifty-six prose and verse texts include the established favourites such as The Battle of Maldon and King Alfred's Preface to his Pastoral Care, but also others which have not before been readily available, such as a complete Easter homily, Aelfric's life of Saint Aethelthryth and all forty-six Durham proverbs. Headnotes establish the literary and historical contexts for the works that are represented, and reflect the rich cultural variety of Anglo-Saxon England. Modern English word glosses and explanatory notes are provided on the same page as the text. Other features include a reference grammar and a comprehensive glossary.
  

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Very good reader all around.
Only two complaints:
1. The binding of the papervback is atrocious. It is on the low end of fair. Do not expect it to last ten years. That said, it is still serviceable.
2. Marsden provides too much help in the glossary and notes. Without figuring out what tense verbs are in, the verbal system cannot be learned. And M. always just gives the reader the answer. On the whole this makes the book more accessible but at the cost of encouraging mediocrity.
 

Review: The Cambridge Old English Reader

User Review  - Runa - Goodreads

Great range of texts and information, but lacking in depth. Still very useful. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Teaching and learning
1
In the Schoolroom from ∆lfrics Colloquy
4
A Personal Miscellany from ∆lfwines Prayerbook
11
A Divinatory Alphabet
13
The Moon and Tide
15
The Age of the Virgin
16
Medicinal Remedies from Balds Leechbook
17
For Dimness of the Eyes
19
Saint Eugenia from the Old English Martyrology
178
A Homily for Easter Sunday from ∆lfrics Sermones catholicae
181
The Dream of the Rood
192
On False Gods Wulfstans De falsis deis
203
The Sermon of the Wolf Wulfstans Sermo Lupi
209
The Seafarer
221
Telling Tales
231
Falling in Love from Apollonius of Tyre
233

For Vomiting
20
For Dysentery
21
Learning Latin from ∆lfrics Excerptiones de arte grammatica anglice
22
A New Beginning Alfreds preface to his translation of Gregorys Cura pastoralis
30
The Wagonwheel of Fate from Alfreds translation of Boethiuss De consolatione Philosophiae
37
Keeping a record
43
Laws of the AngloSaxon Kings
45
Laws of ∆thelberht of Kent c 614
47
Laws of Alfred of Wessex c 890
52
Laws of ∆thelred of England 1014
57
England under Attack from the AngloSaxon Chronicle annals for 98193 9958 and 10023
61
Bedes Ecclesiastical History of the English People
69
The Founding of England
70
The Miracle of Caedmon
76
The Baule of Brunanburh
86
The Will of ∆lfgifu
92
The Fonthill Letter
96
Spreading the Word
103
After the Flood The Old English Hexateuch Gen 8618 and 9813
106
The Crucifixion The Old English Gospels Mt 271154
110
King Alfreds Psalms
116
Psalm 1
118
Psalm 12
119
Psalm 22
120
A Translators Problems ∆lfrics preface to his translation of Genesis
122
Satans Challenge Genesis B lines 338441
130
The Drowning of Pharaohs Army Exodus lines 447564
138
Judith
147
Example and Exhortation
165
Bedes Death Song
167
Northumbrian version
169
Two Holy Women
170
Saint ∆thelthryth from ∆lfrics Lives of Saints
171
The Trees of the Sun and the Moon from the Letter of Alexander
239
Cynewulf and Cyneheard From the AngloSaxon Chronicle annal for 755
245
The Battle of Maldon
251
Beowulf
270
The Tragedy of Hildeburh Beowulf lines 10631159
272
The Slaying of Grendels Mother Beowulf lines 14921590
279
The Fight at Finnsburh
286
Reflection and lament
293
Truth is Trickiest Maxims II
296
The Durham Proverbs
302
Five AngloSaxon Riddles
310
Shield
312
Swan
313
Bible
314
Bookworm
316
Dear
317
The Ruin
322
The Wanderer
327
Wulf and Eadwacer
335
The Wifes Lament
339
Manuscripts and textual emendations
345
Reference Grammar of Old English
355
B Nouns
360
C Adjectives
373
D The use of the cases
376
E Numerals
379
F Adverbs
381
H Useful Old English
393
Glossary
396
Guide to terms
517
Index
526
Copyright

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References to this book

About the author (2004)

Richard Marsden is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Nottingham, where he teaches Old English, Anglo-Saxon studies and the history of the English language. In addition to numerous articles on Old English literature and language, he has published The Text of the Old Testament in Anglo-Saxon England (Cambridge University Press, 1995).

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