The cricket-field. By J. Pycroft (Google eBook)

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Page 228 - ... qui studet optatam cursu contingere metam, multa tulit fecitque puer, sudavit et alsit, abstinuit venere et vino ; qui Pythia cantat tibicen, didicit prius extimuitque magistrum.
Page 24 - Spiritus intus alit: totamque infusa per artus ' Mens agitat molem, et magno se corpore miscet ' Inde hominum pecudumque genus vitaeque volantum ' Et quae marmoreo fert monstra sub aequore pontus.
Page 285 - HISTORY of the EARLY CHURCH, from the First Preaching of the Gospel to the Council of Nicsea. AD 325. By ELIZABETH M. SEWELL, Author of 'Amy Herbert.
Page 46 - I can't say I am sorry I was never quite a schoolboy : an expedition against bargemen, or a match at cricket, may be very pretty things to recollect ; but, thank my stars, I can remember things that are very near as pretty.
Page 3 - Will you not, when you have me, throw stocks at my head, and cry, ' Would my eyes had been beaten out of my head with a cricket-ball the day before I saw thee...
Page 77 - He would bring it from under his arm by a twist, and nearly as high as his arm-pit, and with this action push it, as it were, from him. How it was that the balls acquired the velocity they did by this mode of delivery, I never could comprehend.
Page 10 - ... they sometimes ride out on horseback, and hunt with the Lord Mayor's pack of dogs, when the common hunt goes out. The lower classes divert themselves at football, wrestling, cudgels, ninepins, shovelboard,* cricket...
Page 34 - Still field-sports, in their proper season, are Nature's kind provision to smooth the frown from the brow, to allay " life's fitful fever," to — " Raze out the written troubles of the brain, And by some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the stuffed bosom from that perilous stuff, Which weighs upon the heart.
Page 77 - mode of delivering the ball was very singular. He would bring it from under the arm by a twist, and nearly as high as his armpit, and with this action push it, as it were, from him.
Page 7 - Bowling. —At Marebone and Putney he may see several persons of quality bowling two or three times a week all the summer...

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