The Harveian oration 1866 (Google eBook)

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1866
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Page 39 - He had made dissections of frogs, toads, and a number of other animals, and had curious observations on them ; which papers, together with his goods, in his lodgings at Whitehall, were plundered at the beginning of the rebellion...
Page 34 - He maintained that such restraints are in all cases positively injurious, that their use is utterly inconsistent with a good system of treatment ; and that, on the contrary, the absence of all such restraints is naturally and necessarily associated with treatment such as that of lunatics ought to be, one which substitutes mental for bodily control, and is governed in all its details by the purpose of preventing mental excitement, or of soothing it before it bursts out into violence. He urged this...
Page 19 - They do not esteem it discreditable to desert error, though sanctioned by the highest antiquity, for they know full well that to err, to be deceived, is human ; that many things are discovered by accident, and that many may be learned indifferently from any quarter, by an old man from a youth, by a person of understanding from one of inferior capacity.
Page 41 - Scarbrough desiring him and my lo friend Mr Doctor Ent to looke over those scattered remnant of my poore Librarie and what bookes papers or rare collections they shall thinke fit to present to the Colledge and the rest to be Sold and with the money buy better...
Page 34 - Thus did the experiments of Charlesworth and Conolly confirm the principles of treatment inaugurated by Daquin and Pinel; and prove that the best guide to the treatment of lunatics is to be found in the dictates of an enlightened and refined benevolence. And so the progress of science, by way of experiment, has led men to rules of practice nearer and nearer to the teachings of Christianity. To my eyes a Pauper Lunatic Asylum, such as may now be seen in our English counties...
Page 34 - Pinel ; and prove that the best guide to the treatment of lunatics is to be found in the dictates of an enlightened and refined benevolence. And so the progress of science, by way of experiment, has led men to rules of practice nearer and nearer to the teachings of Christianity. To my eyes a pauper lunatic asylum, such as may now be seen in our English counties, with its pleasant grounds, its airy and cleanly wards, its many comforts, and wise and kindly superintendence, provided for...
Page 34 - And so the progress of science, by way of experiment, has led men to rules of practice nearer and nearer to the teachings of Christianity. To my eyes a pauper lunatic asylum, such as may now be seen in our English counties, with its pleasant grounds, its airy and cleanly wards, its many comforts, and wise and kindly superintendence, provided for those whose lot it is to bear the double burthen of poverty and mental derangement — I say this sight is to me the most blessed manifestation of true civilisation...
Page 33 - The experiment was a trying one, for this great asylum contained eight hundred patients. But the experiment was successful ; and continued experience proved incontestably that in a well-ordered asylum the use even of the strait-waistcoat might be entirely discarded. Dr. Conolly went further than this. He maintained that such restraints are in all cases positively injurious...
Page 33 - In June, 1839, Dr. Conolly was appointed resident physician at Hanwell. In September he had abolished all mechanical restraints. The experiment was a trying one, for this great asylum contained 800 patients.
Page 33 - ... might be entirely discarded. Dr. Conolly went further than this. He maintained that such restraints are in all cases positively injurious, that their use is utterly inconsistent with a good system of treatment ; and that, on the contrary, the absence of all such restraints is naturally and necessarily associated with treatment such as that of lunatics ought to be, one which...

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