Beginning to Read: Thinking and Learning about Print

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MIT Press, 1994 - Education - 494 pages
3 Reviews

Beginning to Read reconciles the debate that has dividedtheorists for decades over the "right" way to help children learn to read. Drawing on a rich arrayof research on the nature and development of reading proficiency, Adams shows educators that theyneed not remain trapped in the phonics versus teaching-for-meaning dilemma. She proposes thatphonics can work together with the whole language approach to teaching reading and provides anintegrated treatment of the knowledge and process involved in skillful reading, the issuessurrounding their acquisition, and the implications for reading instruction.

A Bradford Book

  

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Review: Beginning to Read: Thinking and Learning about Print (Learning, Development, and Conceptual Change)

User Review  - Christin - Goodreads

A very scholarly (read: technical) and well-researched book about best approaches for teaching kids to read. Focuses more on analyzing research and it's implications for the classroom than on actual lesson planning. Read full review

Contents

Chapter
7
From an AgeOld Problem to
13
PART II
29
Research on Prereaders
55
What Needs to Be Taught? Hints from Skilled Readers
93
Orthographic Processing
107
Use and Uses of Meaning
137
Chapter 8
157
PARTY
235
Chapter 12
248
Becoming Aware of Spoken Words
293
The First Steps
333
Chapter 14
375
Chapter 15
409
Afterword by Dorothy Strickland and Bernice Cullinan
425
Name Index
475

PART IV
193
What Do We Want Students
215

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About the author (1994)

Marilyn Jager Adams, Ph.D., is Visiting Scholar, Brown University.

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