Organs Without Bodies: Deleuze and Consequences

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Psychology Press, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 217 pages
5 Reviews
The latest book by the Slovenian critic Slavoj Zizek takes the work of French philosopher Gilles Deleuze as the beginning of a dazzling inquiry into the realms of radical politics, philosophy, film and psychoanalysis. In this deliciously polemical work, Zizek shows Deleuze's connections to both Oedipus and Hegel, figures from whom the French philosopher distanced himself. Zizek turns some Deleuzian concepts around in order to explore the 'organs without bodies' in such films as Fight Club and the works of Hitchcock. Finally, he attacks what he sees as the 'radical chic' Deleuzians, arguing that such projects turn deleuze into an ideologist of today's 'digital capitalism'. With his brilliant energy and fearless argumentation, Zizek sets out to restore a truer, more radical Deleuze than the one we thought we knew.
  

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Review: Organs Without Bodies: Deleuze and Consequences

User Review  - Eli - Goodreads

Some interesting/useful ideas submerged in the usual sea of Zizekian navel-gazing. Read full review

Review: Organs Without Bodies: Deleuze and Consequences

User Review  - Tom Downing - Goodreads

'Organs Without Bodies' was an interesting and even entertaining read. However, if one expects this to be an in-depth commentary or critique on Deleuzian thought, prepare to be disappointed. The book ... Read full review

Contents

III
3
IV
9
V
15
VI
26
VII
41
VIII
45
IX
55
X
60
XVIII
149
XIX
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XX
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XXI
163
XXII
168
XXIII
170
XXIV
177
XXV
183

XI
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
118
XV
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XVI
133
XVII
140
XXVI
187
XXVII
192
XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
215
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Slavoj Zizek is a researcher at the University of Ljubljana. He teaches and lectures frequently in the United States and in Europe. Among his books are Enjoy Your Symptom!, Opera's Second Death, and On Belief, as published by Routledge.

Bibliographic information